Why young people in every sphere – not just business and politics – should learn to lead

Christian Harrison*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Abstract

Leadership is most commonly held to be the ability to motivate others to achieve set goals. For some, this means being heroic and special. The world stood still when Nelson Mandela died. His achievements alone – the freedom fighter turned political prisoner, the first black president of South Africa, the Nobel peace prize winner – would qualify him as a great leader.

For others, leadership is synonymous with management. But although these words are often used interchangeably, they don’t actually mean the same thing. You might well have had firsthand experience of a manager you would not necessarily choose to follow, but whom you must obey simply because they are in a position of authority and you don’t want to lose your job.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation Trust (UK) Limited
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2023

Keywords

  • leader
  • leadership
  • young people
  • business
  • politics
  • leadership development
  • learning
  • management

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