Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.

Daryl Cowan, Ian M. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Objectives:
Grounded in self-determination theory, this study examined potential interpersonal and motivational processes within a sports-based educational program that facilitate self-esteem, efficacy beliefs, and future employment in a sample of disadvantaged unemployed adults.
Design:
A field-based longitudinal design was employed.
Methods:
Participants (N = 39) completed a weekly multi-section questionnaire over the 11-weeks of a sports-based educational program measuring an interpersonally supportive coaching style, three forms of motivation for attending the program (i.e., intrinsic, identified, and introjected motives), self-esteem, and efficacy beliefs.
Results:
At the intra-individual level, the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs was mediated positively by intrinsic motivation and introjected regulation. At the inter-individual level, identified regulation positively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs, while introjected regulation negatively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and both outcome variables. Moreover, participants who gained employment reported higher average self-esteem during the program, compared to their unemployed counterparts.
Conclusions:
This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting specific processes that may help develop or forestall employment skills amongst disadvantaged adults, as well as offering potential theoretical advancements of self-determination theory. In particular, results support the potential role of interpersonal support in facilitating self-determination, but also present a word of caution by proposing that coaches who socio-emotionally invest in program attendees may also promote introjected motives for participation that reflect only minimal internalization. Thought-provoking differences between time-varying and average relationships among motives, esteem, and efficacy beliefs also emerged, which may add insight into the consequences of promoting different behavioural motives.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventDivision of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013 - Manchester, United Kingdom
Duration: 16 Dec 201317 Dec 2013

Conference

ConferenceDivision of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013
Abbreviated titleDSEP Conference 2013
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period16/12/1317/12/13

Fingerprint

Vulnerable Populations
Motivation
Personal Autonomy
Psychology
Self Concept
Sports
Self Efficacy
Mentoring

Cite this

Cowan, D., & Taylor, I. M. (2013). Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.. Abstract from Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, Manchester, United Kingdom.
Cowan, Daryl ; Taylor, Ian M. / Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment. Abstract from Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, Manchester, United Kingdom.
@conference{3afe960a00de468c930f95b904c08470,
title = "Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.",
abstract = "Objectives:Grounded in self-determination theory, this study examined potential interpersonal and motivational processes within a sports-based educational program that facilitate self-esteem, efficacy beliefs, and future employment in a sample of disadvantaged unemployed adults. Design:A field-based longitudinal design was employed.Methods:Participants (N = 39) completed a weekly multi-section questionnaire over the 11-weeks of a sports-based educational program measuring an interpersonally supportive coaching style, three forms of motivation for attending the program (i.e., intrinsic, identified, and introjected motives), self-esteem, and efficacy beliefs. Results: At the intra-individual level, the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs was mediated positively by intrinsic motivation and introjected regulation. At the inter-individual level, identified regulation positively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs, while introjected regulation negatively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and both outcome variables. Moreover, participants who gained employment reported higher average self-esteem during the program, compared to their unemployed counterparts. Conclusions:This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting specific processes that may help develop or forestall employment skills amongst disadvantaged adults, as well as offering potential theoretical advancements of self-determination theory. In particular, results support the potential role of interpersonal support in facilitating self-determination, but also present a word of caution by proposing that coaches who socio-emotionally invest in program attendees may also promote introjected motives for participation that reflect only minimal internalization. Thought-provoking differences between time-varying and average relationships among motives, esteem, and efficacy beliefs also emerged, which may add insight into the consequences of promoting different behavioural motives.",
author = "Daryl Cowan and Taylor, {Ian M.}",
note = "Oral presentation at the 2013 DSEP Conference, Manchester, U.K.; Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, DSEP Conference 2013 ; Conference date: 16-12-2013 Through 17-12-2013",
year = "2013",
language = "English",

}

Cowan, D & Taylor, IM 2013, 'Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.' Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, Manchester, United Kingdom, 16/12/13 - 17/12/13, .

Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment. / Cowan, Daryl; Taylor, Ian M.

2013. Abstract from Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.

AU - Cowan, Daryl

AU - Taylor, Ian M.

N1 - Oral presentation at the 2013 DSEP Conference, Manchester, U.K.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Objectives:Grounded in self-determination theory, this study examined potential interpersonal and motivational processes within a sports-based educational program that facilitate self-esteem, efficacy beliefs, and future employment in a sample of disadvantaged unemployed adults. Design:A field-based longitudinal design was employed.Methods:Participants (N = 39) completed a weekly multi-section questionnaire over the 11-weeks of a sports-based educational program measuring an interpersonally supportive coaching style, three forms of motivation for attending the program (i.e., intrinsic, identified, and introjected motives), self-esteem, and efficacy beliefs. Results: At the intra-individual level, the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs was mediated positively by intrinsic motivation and introjected regulation. At the inter-individual level, identified regulation positively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs, while introjected regulation negatively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and both outcome variables. Moreover, participants who gained employment reported higher average self-esteem during the program, compared to their unemployed counterparts. Conclusions:This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting specific processes that may help develop or forestall employment skills amongst disadvantaged adults, as well as offering potential theoretical advancements of self-determination theory. In particular, results support the potential role of interpersonal support in facilitating self-determination, but also present a word of caution by proposing that coaches who socio-emotionally invest in program attendees may also promote introjected motives for participation that reflect only minimal internalization. Thought-provoking differences between time-varying and average relationships among motives, esteem, and efficacy beliefs also emerged, which may add insight into the consequences of promoting different behavioural motives.

AB - Objectives:Grounded in self-determination theory, this study examined potential interpersonal and motivational processes within a sports-based educational program that facilitate self-esteem, efficacy beliefs, and future employment in a sample of disadvantaged unemployed adults. Design:A field-based longitudinal design was employed.Methods:Participants (N = 39) completed a weekly multi-section questionnaire over the 11-weeks of a sports-based educational program measuring an interpersonally supportive coaching style, three forms of motivation for attending the program (i.e., intrinsic, identified, and introjected motives), self-esteem, and efficacy beliefs. Results: At the intra-individual level, the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs was mediated positively by intrinsic motivation and introjected regulation. At the inter-individual level, identified regulation positively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and efficacy beliefs, while introjected regulation negatively mediated the relationship between interpersonal support and both outcome variables. Moreover, participants who gained employment reported higher average self-esteem during the program, compared to their unemployed counterparts. Conclusions:This study contributes to the existing literature by suggesting specific processes that may help develop or forestall employment skills amongst disadvantaged adults, as well as offering potential theoretical advancements of self-determination theory. In particular, results support the potential role of interpersonal support in facilitating self-determination, but also present a word of caution by proposing that coaches who socio-emotionally invest in program attendees may also promote introjected motives for participation that reflect only minimal internalization. Thought-provoking differences between time-varying and average relationships among motives, esteem, and efficacy beliefs also emerged, which may add insight into the consequences of promoting different behavioural motives.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Cowan D, Taylor IM. Weekly assessments of coach interpersonal involvement, motivation, and psychological development in disadvantaged adults seeking employment.. 2013. Abstract from Division of Sport & Exercise Psychology (DSEP) Conference 2013, Manchester, United Kingdom.