Water from TheWEL: the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme

David Reilly, Audrey Banks, Charles Clark, Desiree Cox, Cath Krawczyk, Patrick Quinn, Fiona Smith

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background

The Healing Shift Enquiry centres in the study of people’s innate capacity for creative change, healing, recovery and wellbeing. From there it explores scaling up this knowledge to create fresh approaches to health and wellbeing, through the expanding layers of self-care, and health care and its environments, staff development and welfare. It then considers wider systems and policies and cultures, working with its sister AfterNow.co.uk project.

Aims & Questions

Might TheWEL programme, developed in secondary care for people with long term conditions (1) succeed in primary care – The PrimaryWEL? Would it work to begin with staff before patients?
- Could we seed a model of cultural shift among health staff, from an expert-treatment illness focus, towards more enabling partnership and wellness enhancement?
- Would this create a supportive environment for later patient participants on TheWEL?
- Could we assist staff in building their own welfare and self-care?

Methods


Parallel with patient cohorts in Glasgow, a StaffWEL was offered in the health care centre in Nairn, alternating with patient cohorts. Evaluation blends:
- Literature Scan of markers of healing process and their relation to Wellness programmes;
- Questionnaires;
- Interviews;
- In-depth case studies;
- Focus groups;
- Pilot study of biological measures of wellbeing;
- External Team Assessment using Learning Journey Methodology

Results

To date 80 of the 280 staff have attended. Their concerning initial levels of distress, loss of wellbeing, and adverse shifts in biological markers, are on par with the 80 patients. Like the patients, staff gave high course ratings, and reported significant positive shifts in wellbeing, and self-care behaviours. Staff self-generated waiting lists for further courses, and by the third intake, 13 of 20 (65%) prospective participants reported making positive changes already, influenced by previously attending colleagues.

Discussion

Rooting service design and wellness courses in the study of healing change process appears to yield helpful results, for patients and staff. There is important potential for scaling this approach up to think in fresh ways and create cultural shifts to assist the current impasse in our models of care in long term conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 25 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventThe Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference: Environmental Influences on Health - Centre for Health Science, Inverness, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Apr 201326 Apr 2013

Conference

ConferenceThe Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityInverness
Period25/04/1326/04/13

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Cite this

Reilly, D., Banks, A., Clark, C., Cox, D., Krawczyk, C., Quinn, P., & Smith, F. (2013). Water from TheWEL: the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme. Paper presented at The Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference, Inverness, United Kingdom.
Reilly, David ; Banks, Audrey ; Clark, Charles ; Cox, Desiree ; Krawczyk, Cath ; Quinn, Patrick ; Smith, Fiona. / Water from TheWEL : the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme. Paper presented at The Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference, Inverness, United Kingdom.
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abstract = "BackgroundThe Healing Shift Enquiry centres in the study of people’s innate capacity for creative change, healing, recovery and wellbeing. From there it explores scaling up this knowledge to create fresh approaches to health and wellbeing, through the expanding layers of self-care, and health care and its environments, staff development and welfare. It then considers wider systems and policies and cultures, working with its sister AfterNow.co.uk project.Aims & QuestionsMight TheWEL programme, developed in secondary care for people with long term conditions (1) succeed in primary care – The PrimaryWEL? Would it work to begin with staff before patients?- Could we seed a model of cultural shift among health staff, from an expert-treatment illness focus, towards more enabling partnership and wellness enhancement?- Would this create a supportive environment for later patient participants on TheWEL?- Could we assist staff in building their own welfare and self-care?MethodsParallel with patient cohorts in Glasgow, a StaffWEL was offered in the health care centre in Nairn, alternating with patient cohorts. Evaluation blends:- Literature Scan of markers of healing process and their relation to Wellness programmes;- Questionnaires;- Interviews;- In-depth case studies;- Focus groups;- Pilot study of biological measures of wellbeing;- External Team Assessment using Learning Journey MethodologyResultsTo date 80 of the 280 staff have attended. Their concerning initial levels of distress, loss of wellbeing, and adverse shifts in biological markers, are on par with the 80 patients. Like the patients, staff gave high course ratings, and reported significant positive shifts in wellbeing, and self-care behaviours. Staff self-generated waiting lists for further courses, and by the third intake, 13 of 20 (65{\%}) prospective participants reported making positive changes already, influenced by previously attending colleagues.DiscussionRooting service design and wellness courses in the study of healing change process appears to yield helpful results, for patients and staff. There is important potential for scaling this approach up to think in fresh ways and create cultural shifts to assist the current impasse in our models of care in long term conditions.",
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Reilly, D, Banks, A, Clark, C, Cox, D, Krawczyk, C, Quinn, P & Smith, F 2013, 'Water from TheWEL: the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme' Paper presented at The Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference, Inverness, United Kingdom, 25/04/13 - 26/04/13, .

Water from TheWEL : the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme. / Reilly, David; Banks, Audrey; Clark, Charles; Cox, Desiree; Krawczyk, Cath; Quinn, Patrick; Smith, Fiona.

2013. Paper presented at The Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference, Inverness, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Water from TheWEL

T2 - the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme

AU - Reilly, David

AU - Banks, Audrey

AU - Clark, Charles

AU - Cox, Desiree

AU - Krawczyk, Cath

AU - Quinn, Patrick

AU - Smith, Fiona

PY - 2013/4/25

Y1 - 2013/4/25

N2 - BackgroundThe Healing Shift Enquiry centres in the study of people’s innate capacity for creative change, healing, recovery and wellbeing. From there it explores scaling up this knowledge to create fresh approaches to health and wellbeing, through the expanding layers of self-care, and health care and its environments, staff development and welfare. It then considers wider systems and policies and cultures, working with its sister AfterNow.co.uk project.Aims & QuestionsMight TheWEL programme, developed in secondary care for people with long term conditions (1) succeed in primary care – The PrimaryWEL? Would it work to begin with staff before patients?- Could we seed a model of cultural shift among health staff, from an expert-treatment illness focus, towards more enabling partnership and wellness enhancement?- Would this create a supportive environment for later patient participants on TheWEL?- Could we assist staff in building their own welfare and self-care?MethodsParallel with patient cohorts in Glasgow, a StaffWEL was offered in the health care centre in Nairn, alternating with patient cohorts. Evaluation blends:- Literature Scan of markers of healing process and their relation to Wellness programmes;- Questionnaires;- Interviews;- In-depth case studies;- Focus groups;- Pilot study of biological measures of wellbeing;- External Team Assessment using Learning Journey MethodologyResultsTo date 80 of the 280 staff have attended. Their concerning initial levels of distress, loss of wellbeing, and adverse shifts in biological markers, are on par with the 80 patients. Like the patients, staff gave high course ratings, and reported significant positive shifts in wellbeing, and self-care behaviours. Staff self-generated waiting lists for further courses, and by the third intake, 13 of 20 (65%) prospective participants reported making positive changes already, influenced by previously attending colleagues.DiscussionRooting service design and wellness courses in the study of healing change process appears to yield helpful results, for patients and staff. There is important potential for scaling this approach up to think in fresh ways and create cultural shifts to assist the current impasse in our models of care in long term conditions.

AB - BackgroundThe Healing Shift Enquiry centres in the study of people’s innate capacity for creative change, healing, recovery and wellbeing. From there it explores scaling up this knowledge to create fresh approaches to health and wellbeing, through the expanding layers of self-care, and health care and its environments, staff development and welfare. It then considers wider systems and policies and cultures, working with its sister AfterNow.co.uk project.Aims & QuestionsMight TheWEL programme, developed in secondary care for people with long term conditions (1) succeed in primary care – The PrimaryWEL? Would it work to begin with staff before patients?- Could we seed a model of cultural shift among health staff, from an expert-treatment illness focus, towards more enabling partnership and wellness enhancement?- Would this create a supportive environment for later patient participants on TheWEL?- Could we assist staff in building their own welfare and self-care?MethodsParallel with patient cohorts in Glasgow, a StaffWEL was offered in the health care centre in Nairn, alternating with patient cohorts. Evaluation blends:- Literature Scan of markers of healing process and their relation to Wellness programmes;- Questionnaires;- Interviews;- In-depth case studies;- Focus groups;- Pilot study of biological measures of wellbeing;- External Team Assessment using Learning Journey MethodologyResultsTo date 80 of the 280 staff have attended. Their concerning initial levels of distress, loss of wellbeing, and adverse shifts in biological markers, are on par with the 80 patients. Like the patients, staff gave high course ratings, and reported significant positive shifts in wellbeing, and self-care behaviours. Staff self-generated waiting lists for further courses, and by the third intake, 13 of 20 (65%) prospective participants reported making positive changes already, influenced by previously attending colleagues.DiscussionRooting service design and wellness courses in the study of healing change process appears to yield helpful results, for patients and staff. There is important potential for scaling this approach up to think in fresh ways and create cultural shifts to assist the current impasse in our models of care in long term conditions.

M3 - Paper

ER -

Reilly D, Banks A, Clark C, Cox D, Krawczyk C, Quinn P et al. Water from TheWEL: the healing shift enquiry - seeding a shift towards a health culture in an ill(ness) environment. Initial learning from a StaffWEL - wellness enhancement learning - programme. 2013. Paper presented at The Scottish School of Primary Care 2013 Annual Conference, Inverness, United Kingdom.