Ward staff perceptions of the role of the advanced nurse practitioner in a ‘hospital at day’ setting

Stuart Halliday, David Hunter, Laura McMillan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim:
to examine ward staff perceptions on the role of the ‘hospital at day’ advanced nurse practitioner (ANP). This term is used locally to refer to a model first introduced into ‘hospital at night’ teams, in response to changes in working patterns of junior doctors, where an advanced nurse practitioner is based on the ward—the model was subsequently rolled out to daytime teams.

Methods:
a qualitative descriptive phenomenological approach was adopted to carry out this study with a purposive sample of ten participants. Participants were interviewed individually using semi-structured interviews to gain insights into their perceptions on the role of the ANP, following Colaizzi's analytical model of data analysis.

Findings:
four major themes were identified. The first overarching theme was effectiveness of the ANP role. There was evidence that the role was not only clinically effective in the ward but also in relation to organisational priorities such as impact on patient flow. Secondly it was acknowledged that having an ANP based on the ward and as a ‘constant’ in the ward area, when medical teams rotate, provides team stability and improves the functioning of the ward area. Despite the positivity recognised, the third theme identified that having a ward-based ANP may affect skill acquisition and development and may lead to the ‘de-skilling’ of staff. Lastly it was acknowledged that there remains an overall confusion about the role of the ANP.

Conclusion:
the themes identified reflect what is already known about the wider perceived role of the ANP. Moreover, this study adds to the limited literature available specifically on the benefits of the ANP within ‘hospital at day’ roles.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-97
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Volume27
Issue number2
Early online date25 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 25 Jan 2018

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