Utility of the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in the cardiometabolic risk assessment of youth stratified by body mass index

D.S. Buchan, L.M. Boddy, J.-P. Despres, F.M. Grace, N. Sculthorpe, C. Mahoney, J.S. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is unclear whether the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HTWP) can be used to identify those at most risk of cardiometabolic disorders.

OBJECTIVES

The utility of the HTWP as a useful predictor of cardiometabolic risk in youth stratified by body mass index was assessed.

METHODS

Three hundred and eighty-seven children (12-17.5 years) were used within this cross-sectional study. Participants were classified as normal weight or overweight/obese according to the International Obesity Task Force criteria. The HTWP phenotype was defined as having a waist circumference ≥90th percentile for age and gender with concomitant triglyceride concentrations ≥1.24 mmol L(-1) . Cardiometabolic risk profiles were compared using MANCOVA.

RESULTS

Normal weight participants with the HTWP had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein 2.6 ± 0.4 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 mg L(-1) (P < 0.05) and cardiometabolic risk scores (1.3 ± 0.3 vs. -0.7 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.4 vs. -0.5 ± 0.2; both P < 0.05) compared with those of a normal weight without the HTWP. Overweight/obese participants with the HTWP had significantly higher C-reactive protein levels (3.5 ± 0.6 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.05) as well as both cardiometabolic risk scores (1.6 ± 0.6 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.6 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2; both P < 0.001) when compared with overweight/obese participants without the HTWP.

CONCLUSIONS

The HTWP may serve as a simple and clinically useful approach to identify youth at increased cardiometabolic risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-298
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric obesity
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Aug 2015

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