Using functional responses to assess predator hatching phenology implications for pioneering prey in arid temporary pools

Ryan J. Wasserman, Mhairi E Alexander, Daniel Barrios-O'Neill, Olaf L.F. Weyl, Tatenda Dalu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study assessed the functional responses of two predatory ephemeral pond specialist copepods, Lovenula raynerae and Paradiaptomus lamellatus towards their natural prey Daphnia longispina. Lovenula raynerae exhibited an elevated overall functional response compared with that of P. lamellatus. In addition, L. raynerae exhibited a Type II functional response whereas a weak trend towards a Type III response was found for P. lamellatus. Differences in predator hatching phenology may, therefore, have implications for daphniid population persistence during a pond's hydroperiod. This is pertinent in that predation pressure in the early hydroperiod phase of ephemeral ponds is largely provided by hatching predatory copepods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-158
JournalJournal of Plankton Research
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

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ephemeral pool
functional response
phenology
hatching
hydroperiod
predator
predators
Copepoda
persistence
pond
predation

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Wasserman, Ryan J. ; Alexander, Mhairi E ; Barrios-O'Neill, Daniel ; Weyl, Olaf L.F. ; Dalu, Tatenda. / Using functional responses to assess predator hatching phenology implications for pioneering prey in arid temporary pools. In: Journal of Plankton Research. 2016 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 154-158.
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Using functional responses to assess predator hatching phenology implications for pioneering prey in arid temporary pools. / Wasserman, Ryan J.; Alexander, Mhairi E; Barrios-O'Neill, Daniel; Weyl, Olaf L.F.; Dalu, Tatenda.

In: Journal of Plankton Research, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 154-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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