Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children

Mairi S. Dent, Lesley Fowler, Moira S. Lewitt

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background
Family-based intervention programmes are effective for overweight children. Most programmes follow the weight/height2 (BMI). We have previously shown, in a group of Welsh schoolchildren, that BMI does not fully adjust for the effect of height during puberty and that waist to-height ratio (WaHtR) is more reliable (Lewitt et al., Ann Hum Biol 39:440, 2012).

Aim
To determine the relationship between height and weight, and height and waist circumference in overweight children participating in a family-based intervention programme (MEND) in Scotland.

Subjects
Girls (n=32) and boys (n=30) aged 7-13 years and > 91st centile for BMI, adjusted for age and sex. MEND tracks waist as well as BMI. Log-log regression analysis was used to estimate the power with which to raise height to control for the effect on weight and waist circumference.
ResultsBMI correlated with height in girls (r=0.513, p=0.003) and boys (r=0.402, p=0.027). Log-log regression analysis indicated that height needed to be raised to the power 2.9 and 2.7, respectively,to control for its effect on weight. Waist also correlated with height in girls (r=0.615, p<0.001) and boys (r=0.557, p=0.001). There was no relationship between WaHtR and height in girls (r=-0.087,p=0.635) or boys (r=-0.005, p=0.977). During the 10 week MEND intervention WaHtR decreased by 3.6% in girls and 3.5% in boys while BMI changed 2.9 and 2.5%, respectively (both p<0.001).
ConclusionWaHtR is a more reliable than BMI in overweight children aged 7-13 years, and should be used to track responses to lifestyle interventions in this age group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages8-8
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2013
EventSociety for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting - Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom
Duration: 10 Oct 2013 → …

Conference

ConferenceSociety for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityOxford
Period10/10/13 → …

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Weights and Measures
Waist Circumference
Regression Analysis
Scotland
Puberty
Life Style
Age Groups
Waist-Height Ratio
MEND
Power (Psychology)

Cite this

Dent, M. S., Fowler, L., & Lewitt, M. S. (2013). Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children. 8-8. Paper presented at Society for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Dent, Mairi S. ; Fowler, Lesley ; Lewitt, Moira S. / Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children. Paper presented at Society for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom.1 p.
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title = "Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children",
abstract = "BackgroundFamily-based intervention programmes are effective for overweight children. Most programmes follow the weight/height2 (BMI). We have previously shown, in a group of Welsh schoolchildren, that BMI does not fully adjust for the effect of height during puberty and that waist to-height ratio (WaHtR) is more reliable (Lewitt et al., Ann Hum Biol 39:440, 2012).AimTo determine the relationship between height and weight, and height and waist circumference in overweight children participating in a family-based intervention programme (MEND) in Scotland.SubjectsGirls (n=32) and boys (n=30) aged 7-13 years and > 91st centile for BMI, adjusted for age and sex. MEND tracks waist as well as BMI. Log-log regression analysis was used to estimate the power with which to raise height to control for the effect on weight and waist circumference.ResultsBMI correlated with height in girls (r=0.513, p=0.003) and boys (r=0.402, p=0.027). Log-log regression analysis indicated that height needed to be raised to the power 2.9 and 2.7, respectively,to control for its effect on weight. Waist also correlated with height in girls (r=0.615, p<0.001) and boys (r=0.557, p=0.001). There was no relationship between WaHtR and height in girls (r=-0.087,p=0.635) or boys (r=-0.005, p=0.977). During the 10 week MEND intervention WaHtR decreased by 3.6{\%} in girls and 3.5{\%} in boys while BMI changed 2.9 and 2.5{\%}, respectively (both p<0.001).ConclusionWaHtR is a more reliable than BMI in overweight children aged 7-13 years, and should be used to track responses to lifestyle interventions in this age group.",
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Dent, MS, Fowler, L & Lewitt, MS 2013, 'Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children' Paper presented at Society for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom, 10/10/13, pp. 8-8.

Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children. / Dent, Mairi S.; Fowler, Lesley; Lewitt, Moira S.

2013. 8-8 Paper presented at Society for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children

AU - Dent, Mairi S.

AU - Fowler, Lesley

AU - Lewitt, Moira S.

PY - 2013/10/10

Y1 - 2013/10/10

N2 - BackgroundFamily-based intervention programmes are effective for overweight children. Most programmes follow the weight/height2 (BMI). We have previously shown, in a group of Welsh schoolchildren, that BMI does not fully adjust for the effect of height during puberty and that waist to-height ratio (WaHtR) is more reliable (Lewitt et al., Ann Hum Biol 39:440, 2012).AimTo determine the relationship between height and weight, and height and waist circumference in overweight children participating in a family-based intervention programme (MEND) in Scotland.SubjectsGirls (n=32) and boys (n=30) aged 7-13 years and > 91st centile for BMI, adjusted for age and sex. MEND tracks waist as well as BMI. Log-log regression analysis was used to estimate the power with which to raise height to control for the effect on weight and waist circumference.ResultsBMI correlated with height in girls (r=0.513, p=0.003) and boys (r=0.402, p=0.027). Log-log regression analysis indicated that height needed to be raised to the power 2.9 and 2.7, respectively,to control for its effect on weight. Waist also correlated with height in girls (r=0.615, p<0.001) and boys (r=0.557, p=0.001). There was no relationship between WaHtR and height in girls (r=-0.087,p=0.635) or boys (r=-0.005, p=0.977). During the 10 week MEND intervention WaHtR decreased by 3.6% in girls and 3.5% in boys while BMI changed 2.9 and 2.5%, respectively (both p<0.001).ConclusionWaHtR is a more reliable than BMI in overweight children aged 7-13 years, and should be used to track responses to lifestyle interventions in this age group.

AB - BackgroundFamily-based intervention programmes are effective for overweight children. Most programmes follow the weight/height2 (BMI). We have previously shown, in a group of Welsh schoolchildren, that BMI does not fully adjust for the effect of height during puberty and that waist to-height ratio (WaHtR) is more reliable (Lewitt et al., Ann Hum Biol 39:440, 2012).AimTo determine the relationship between height and weight, and height and waist circumference in overweight children participating in a family-based intervention programme (MEND) in Scotland.SubjectsGirls (n=32) and boys (n=30) aged 7-13 years and > 91st centile for BMI, adjusted for age and sex. MEND tracks waist as well as BMI. Log-log regression analysis was used to estimate the power with which to raise height to control for the effect on weight and waist circumference.ResultsBMI correlated with height in girls (r=0.513, p=0.003) and boys (r=0.402, p=0.027). Log-log regression analysis indicated that height needed to be raised to the power 2.9 and 2.7, respectively,to control for its effect on weight. Waist also correlated with height in girls (r=0.615, p<0.001) and boys (r=0.557, p=0.001). There was no relationship between WaHtR and height in girls (r=-0.087,p=0.635) or boys (r=-0.005, p=0.977). During the 10 week MEND intervention WaHtR decreased by 3.6% in girls and 3.5% in boys while BMI changed 2.9 and 2.5%, respectively (both p<0.001).ConclusionWaHtR is a more reliable than BMI in overweight children aged 7-13 years, and should be used to track responses to lifestyle interventions in this age group.

M3 - Paper

SP - 8

EP - 8

ER -

Dent MS, Fowler L, Lewitt MS. Use of BMI and WaHtR in an intervention programme for overweight and obese Scottish children. 2013. Paper presented at Society for the Study of Human Biology Proffered Papers Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom.