‘Truth be told…it’s my job and I’m told to do it’: teachers’ perspectives on supporting young people from black and minority ethnic groups in Glasgow schools onto positive destinations

Nighet Riaz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper presents a qualitative case study which explores the perceptions of teachers who are responsible for students on the cusp of leaving compulsory education, and in particular, students who have been identified as having the propensity to fall out of education, employment and training. With a disproportionate percentage of young people identified as needing additional support coming from the Black and Minority Ethnic group (BME), this research looks at teachers’ perceptions of the nature of support which can be offered.

Bourdieu’s theoretical framework of habitus, field and capital is used to explore findings from semi-structured interviews with teachers. Key themes were identified from the interview data to better understand policy and practice. Findings suggest that policy interventions are outcome based, while school is an environment where the teachers are constrained by dominant practices. However, what is evident is the lack of BME teachers’ voices, which would have added to the study.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-113
Number of pages18
JournalScottish Educational Review
Volume52
Issue number1
Early online date15 Feb 2021
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • policy
  • young people
  • disaffection
  • teachers
  • ethnicity
  • schools

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