Training and development needs of health visitors: 27-30 month child health review.

Jeanie Rankin, MacInnes, Sandra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The 27-30 month child health review was introduced in Scotland in 2013 to promote strong early child development. This exploratory study focuses on the training needs of health visitors to effectively deliver this new assessment.

Methods: A survey questionnaire was sent to all health visitors in NHS Lanarkshire (baseline quantifiable data, n=109 of 180). Focus groups (n=27) further explored related issues in detail.

Results: Priority areas for training and development included: tools for assessing child development; normal development of the child (in particular vision and hearing); assessing children with long-term conditions; using strength/asset-based approaches; documentation; shared terminology; professional roles; and request-for-assistance pathways.

Conclusions: NHS Boards should incorporate these training and development needs for all health visitors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-448
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Health Visiting
Volume2
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Community Health Nurses
Child Development
Professional Role
Scotland
Focus Groups
Terminology
Documentation
Hearing
Child Health

Cite this

@article{9f17c35ee23a40a2849b66ef6ed2ef54,
title = "Training and development needs of health visitors: 27-30 month child health review.",
abstract = "Objectives: The 27-30 month child health review was introduced in Scotland in 2013 to promote strong early child development. This exploratory study focuses on the training needs of health visitors to effectively deliver this new assessment. Methods: A survey questionnaire was sent to all health visitors in NHS Lanarkshire (baseline quantifiable data, n=109 of 180). Focus groups (n=27) further explored related issues in detail. Results: Priority areas for training and development included: tools for assessing child development; normal development of the child (in particular vision and hearing); assessing children with long-term conditions; using strength/asset-based approaches; documentation; shared terminology; professional roles; and request-for-assistance pathways. Conclusions: NHS Boards should incorporate these training and development needs for all health visitors.",
author = "Jeanie Rankin and MacInnes, Sandra",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "442--448",
journal = "Journal of Health Visiting",
issn = "2050-8719",
publisher = "Mark Allen Healthcare",
number = "8",

}

Training and development needs of health visitors : 27-30 month child health review. / Rankin, Jeanie; Sandra, MacInnes,.

In: Journal of Health Visiting, Vol. 2, No. 8, 2014, p. 442-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Training and development needs of health visitors

T2 - 27-30 month child health review.

AU - Rankin, Jeanie

AU - Sandra, MacInnes,

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objectives: The 27-30 month child health review was introduced in Scotland in 2013 to promote strong early child development. This exploratory study focuses on the training needs of health visitors to effectively deliver this new assessment. Methods: A survey questionnaire was sent to all health visitors in NHS Lanarkshire (baseline quantifiable data, n=109 of 180). Focus groups (n=27) further explored related issues in detail. Results: Priority areas for training and development included: tools for assessing child development; normal development of the child (in particular vision and hearing); assessing children with long-term conditions; using strength/asset-based approaches; documentation; shared terminology; professional roles; and request-for-assistance pathways. Conclusions: NHS Boards should incorporate these training and development needs for all health visitors.

AB - Objectives: The 27-30 month child health review was introduced in Scotland in 2013 to promote strong early child development. This exploratory study focuses on the training needs of health visitors to effectively deliver this new assessment. Methods: A survey questionnaire was sent to all health visitors in NHS Lanarkshire (baseline quantifiable data, n=109 of 180). Focus groups (n=27) further explored related issues in detail. Results: Priority areas for training and development included: tools for assessing child development; normal development of the child (in particular vision and hearing); assessing children with long-term conditions; using strength/asset-based approaches; documentation; shared terminology; professional roles; and request-for-assistance pathways. Conclusions: NHS Boards should incorporate these training and development needs for all health visitors.

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 442

EP - 448

JO - Journal of Health Visiting

JF - Journal of Health Visiting

SN - 2050-8719

IS - 8

ER -