Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games

James Boyle, Elizabeth A. Boyle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence that playing games leads to a range of cognitive and perceptual advantages. In addition there has been speculation
that digital games can support higher level thinking. In this paper we propose that viewing these gains from the perspective of executive functions can help to provide a more coherent approach to understanding the cognitive benefits of playing games. Executive functions refer to a range of higher level cognitive processes that regulate, control and manage other cognitive processes. Three models are considered: Baddeley’s model of working memory [1], and two
models of executive functions, that of Anderson [2], and that of Diamond [3]. The implications for serious games research and games design and for future research are considered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGames and Learning Alliance
Subtitle of host publicationSecond International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers
EditorsAlessandro De Gloria
PublisherSpringer International Publishing AG
Pages187-199
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9783319121574
ISBN (Print)9783319121567
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Sciences
PublisherSpringer
Volume8605
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

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Computer games
Diamonds
Data storage equipment

Cite this

Boyle, J., & Boyle, E. A. (2014). Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games. In A. De Gloria (Ed.), Games and Learning Alliance: Second International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers (pp. 187-199). (Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences; Vol. 8605). Springer International Publishing AG. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12157-4_15
Boyle, James ; Boyle, Elizabeth A. / Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games. Games and Learning Alliance: Second International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers. editor / Alessandro De Gloria. Springer International Publishing AG, 2014. pp. 187-199 (Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences).
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Boyle, J & Boyle, EA 2014, Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games. in A De Gloria (ed.), Games and Learning Alliance: Second International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences, vol. 8605, Springer International Publishing AG, pp. 187-199. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12157-4_15

Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games. / Boyle, James; Boyle, Elizabeth A.

Games and Learning Alliance: Second International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers. ed. / Alessandro De Gloria. Springer International Publishing AG, 2014. p. 187-199 (Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences; Vol. 8605).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Boyle J, Boyle EA. Towards an understanding of the relationship between executive functions and learning outcomes from serious computer games. In De Gloria A, editor, Games and Learning Alliance: Second International Conference, GALA 2013, Paris, France, October 23-25, 2013, Revised Selected Papers. Springer International Publishing AG. 2014. p. 187-199. (Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-12157-4_15