Abstract

The transport of live fish for aquaculture, either for food or as companion animals, presents a major issue for animal welfare. The stressors associated with live transportation are well documented with a focus on maintaining water quality during transport to reduce stress. Far less considered is our ability to enhance health and welfare during transport through the use of dietary and water additives prior to and during transport. With increasing interest in the use of plant essential oils as feed additives in food fish aquaculture and the increased availability of products claiming to alleviate stress in ornamental species, there is a need for scientific investigation into these potential welfare-promoting methods. Here we summarise current knowledge on the use of food additives, water conditioners, antibiotics, antimicrobials, and probiotics to promote fish health during transport. This review aims to highlight the gaps in our knowledge surrounding promising ways of promoting fish health during transport and to stimulate new research in this area.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-278
Number of pages16
JournalReviews in Aquaculture
Volume11
Issue number1
Early online date22 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

fish health
fish culture
feed additives
food additives
fish
ornamental plants
animal welfare
probiotics
pets
essential oils
water quality
anti-infective agents
water
antibiotics
methodology

Keywords

  • Fish transport
  • Stress
  • Water quality
  • Welfare management

Cite this

@article{fece1f7443cc4fd7b1a385477e630bc8,
title = "The use of feed and water additives for live fish transport",
abstract = "The transport of live fish for aquaculture, either for food or as companion animals, presents a major issue for animal welfare. The stressors associated with live transportation are well documented with a focus on maintaining water quality during transport to reduce stress. Far less considered is our ability to enhance health and welfare during transport through the use of dietary and water additives prior to and during transport. With increasing interest in the use of plant essential oils as feed additives in food fish aquaculture and the increased availability of products claiming to alleviate stress in ornamental species, there is a need for scientific investigation into these potential welfare-promoting methods. Here we summarise current knowledge on the use of food additives, water conditioners, antibiotics, antimicrobials, and probiotics to promote fish health during transport. This review aims to highlight the gaps in our knowledge surrounding promising ways of promoting fish health during transport and to stimulate new research in this area.",
keywords = "Fish transport, Stress, Water quality, Welfare management",
author = "Myriam Vanderzwalmen and Lewis Eaton and Carrie Mullen and Fiona Henriquez and Peter Carey and Donna Snellgrove and Katherine Sloman",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1111/raq.12239",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "263--278",
journal = "Reviews in Aquaculture",
issn = "1753-5131",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

The use of feed and water additives for live fish transport. / Vanderzwalmen, Myriam; Eaton, Lewis; Mullen, Carrie; Henriquez, Fiona ; Carey, Peter; Snellgrove, Donna; Sloman, Katherine.

In: Reviews in Aquaculture, Vol. 11, No. 1, 14.02.2019, p. 263-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The use of feed and water additives for live fish transport

AU - Vanderzwalmen, Myriam

AU - Eaton, Lewis

AU - Mullen, Carrie

AU - Henriquez, Fiona

AU - Carey, Peter

AU - Snellgrove, Donna

AU - Sloman, Katherine

PY - 2019/2/14

Y1 - 2019/2/14

N2 - The transport of live fish for aquaculture, either for food or as companion animals, presents a major issue for animal welfare. The stressors associated with live transportation are well documented with a focus on maintaining water quality during transport to reduce stress. Far less considered is our ability to enhance health and welfare during transport through the use of dietary and water additives prior to and during transport. With increasing interest in the use of plant essential oils as feed additives in food fish aquaculture and the increased availability of products claiming to alleviate stress in ornamental species, there is a need for scientific investigation into these potential welfare-promoting methods. Here we summarise current knowledge on the use of food additives, water conditioners, antibiotics, antimicrobials, and probiotics to promote fish health during transport. This review aims to highlight the gaps in our knowledge surrounding promising ways of promoting fish health during transport and to stimulate new research in this area.

AB - The transport of live fish for aquaculture, either for food or as companion animals, presents a major issue for animal welfare. The stressors associated with live transportation are well documented with a focus on maintaining water quality during transport to reduce stress. Far less considered is our ability to enhance health and welfare during transport through the use of dietary and water additives prior to and during transport. With increasing interest in the use of plant essential oils as feed additives in food fish aquaculture and the increased availability of products claiming to alleviate stress in ornamental species, there is a need for scientific investigation into these potential welfare-promoting methods. Here we summarise current knowledge on the use of food additives, water conditioners, antibiotics, antimicrobials, and probiotics to promote fish health during transport. This review aims to highlight the gaps in our knowledge surrounding promising ways of promoting fish health during transport and to stimulate new research in this area.

KW - Fish transport

KW - Stress

KW - Water quality

KW - Welfare management

U2 - 10.1111/raq.12239

DO - 10.1111/raq.12239

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 263

EP - 278

JO - Reviews in Aquaculture

JF - Reviews in Aquaculture

SN - 1753-5131

IS - 1

ER -