The role of computers in visual art

Mario Verdicchio

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The beginnings of computer art can be traced back to the 1960s, when three computer scientists began, almost at the same time and independently from one another, to use their computers to create geometrical designs, among them was Frieder Nake, then working at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Some of Nake’s works were shown in the gallery “Wendelin Niedlich” in Stuttgart in November 1965, which can be considered as the first contact between an output of a computer system and the Artworld, and the reaction of most art critics was rather dismissive. This work analyzes Nake’s reply to such criticism in the form of three considerations: (a) the novelty of generative procedures by means of pseudorandom numbers; (b) the evolution of authorship thanks to code parametrization; (c) a recognition of the key role of the audience in the creation of artistic experiences. By means of examples from modern art and from contemporary art we will show that (a) and (b) only refer to procedures that are indeed made more efficient by the use of computers, but do not need these devices to exists, whereas (c) seems to shed light on a field that is essentially based on today’s computing technology, namely, interactive art.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHistory and Philosophy of Computing
Subtitle of host publicationThird International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers
EditorsFabio Gadducci, Mirko Tavosanis
PublisherSpringer International Publishing AG
Pages287-299
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-47285-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventHistory and Philosophy of Computing - Pisa, Italy
Duration: 8 Oct 201511 Oct 2015
Conference number: 3
https://hapoc2015.sciencesconf.org/

Publication series

NameIFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Volume487
ISSN (Print)1868-4238

Conference

ConferenceHistory and Philosophy of Computing
Abbreviated titleHaPoC
CountryItaly
CityPisa
Period8/10/1511/10/15
Internet address

Fingerprint

Art
Stuttgart
Art Critic
Generative
Authorship
Interactive Art
Criticism
Artworld
Germany
1960s
Computer Art
Novelty

Keywords

  • Computer Art
  • generative art
  • interactive art

Cite this

Verdicchio, M. (2015). The role of computers in visual art. In F. Gadducci, & M. Tavosanis (Eds.), History and Philosophy of Computing: Third International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers (pp. 287-299). (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology; Vol. 487). Springer International Publishing AG. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20
Verdicchio, Mario. / The role of computers in visual art. History and Philosophy of Computing: Third International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers. editor / Fabio Gadducci ; Mirko Tavosanis. Springer International Publishing AG, 2015. pp. 287-299 (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology).
@inproceedings{229cc28ff8bd4b55b12c31a3267c043e,
title = "The role of computers in visual art",
abstract = "The beginnings of computer art can be traced back to the 1960s, when three computer scientists began, almost at the same time and independently from one another, to use their computers to create geometrical designs, among them was Frieder Nake, then working at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Some of Nake’s works were shown in the gallery “Wendelin Niedlich” in Stuttgart in November 1965, which can be considered as the first contact between an output of a computer system and the Artworld, and the reaction of most art critics was rather dismissive. This work analyzes Nake’s reply to such criticism in the form of three considerations: (a) the novelty of generative procedures by means of pseudorandom numbers; (b) the evolution of authorship thanks to code parametrization; (c) a recognition of the key role of the audience in the creation of artistic experiences. By means of examples from modern art and from contemporary art we will show that (a) and (b) only refer to procedures that are indeed made more efficient by the use of computers, but do not need these devices to exists, whereas (c) seems to shed light on a field that is essentially based on today’s computing technology, namely, interactive art.",
keywords = "Computer Art, generative art, interactive art",
author = "Mario Verdicchio",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "8",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-3-319-47285-0",
series = "IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology",
publisher = "Springer International Publishing AG",
pages = "287--299",
editor = "Fabio Gadducci and Mirko Tavosanis",
booktitle = "History and Philosophy of Computing",
address = "Switzerland",

}

Verdicchio, M 2015, The role of computers in visual art. in F Gadducci & M Tavosanis (eds), History and Philosophy of Computing: Third International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers. IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, vol. 487, Springer International Publishing AG, pp. 287-299, History and Philosophy of Computing, Pisa, Italy, 8/10/15. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20

The role of computers in visual art. / Verdicchio, Mario.

History and Philosophy of Computing: Third International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers. ed. / Fabio Gadducci; Mirko Tavosanis. Springer International Publishing AG, 2015. p. 287-299 (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology; Vol. 487).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - The role of computers in visual art

AU - Verdicchio, Mario

PY - 2015/10/8

Y1 - 2015/10/8

N2 - The beginnings of computer art can be traced back to the 1960s, when three computer scientists began, almost at the same time and independently from one another, to use their computers to create geometrical designs, among them was Frieder Nake, then working at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Some of Nake’s works were shown in the gallery “Wendelin Niedlich” in Stuttgart in November 1965, which can be considered as the first contact between an output of a computer system and the Artworld, and the reaction of most art critics was rather dismissive. This work analyzes Nake’s reply to such criticism in the form of three considerations: (a) the novelty of generative procedures by means of pseudorandom numbers; (b) the evolution of authorship thanks to code parametrization; (c) a recognition of the key role of the audience in the creation of artistic experiences. By means of examples from modern art and from contemporary art we will show that (a) and (b) only refer to procedures that are indeed made more efficient by the use of computers, but do not need these devices to exists, whereas (c) seems to shed light on a field that is essentially based on today’s computing technology, namely, interactive art.

AB - The beginnings of computer art can be traced back to the 1960s, when three computer scientists began, almost at the same time and independently from one another, to use their computers to create geometrical designs, among them was Frieder Nake, then working at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Some of Nake’s works were shown in the gallery “Wendelin Niedlich” in Stuttgart in November 1965, which can be considered as the first contact between an output of a computer system and the Artworld, and the reaction of most art critics was rather dismissive. This work analyzes Nake’s reply to such criticism in the form of three considerations: (a) the novelty of generative procedures by means of pseudorandom numbers; (b) the evolution of authorship thanks to code parametrization; (c) a recognition of the key role of the audience in the creation of artistic experiences. By means of examples from modern art and from contemporary art we will show that (a) and (b) only refer to procedures that are indeed made more efficient by the use of computers, but do not need these devices to exists, whereas (c) seems to shed light on a field that is essentially based on today’s computing technology, namely, interactive art.

KW - Computer Art

KW - generative art

KW - interactive art

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 978-3-319-47285-0

T3 - IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology

SP - 287

EP - 299

BT - History and Philosophy of Computing

A2 - Gadducci, Fabio

A2 - Tavosanis, Mirko

PB - Springer International Publishing AG

ER -

Verdicchio M. The role of computers in visual art. In Gadducci F, Tavosanis M, editors, History and Philosophy of Computing: Third International Conference, HaPoC 2015, Pisa, Italy, October 8-11, 2015, Revised Selected Papers. Springer International Publishing AG. 2015. p. 287-299. (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47286-7_20