The role of cognitive learning styles in accounting education: developing learning competencies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential for cognitive learning style (CLS) to develop students' learning competencies is limited by the variety of conceptualizations, constructs and instruments. This paper contrasts two models for operationalizing CLS: Furnham's [Furnham, A. (1995). The relationship between personality and intelligence to cognitive style and achievement. In D. H. Saklofske, M. Zeidner (Eds.), International handbook of personality and intelligence (pp. 397–413). New York: Plenum Press.] conceptualization of the roles of CLS, and Ramsden's [Ramsden, P. (1992). Learning to teach in higher education. London: Routledge.] contextual model of student learning. The origins of CLS, its fundamental dimensions, and methods of assessment are also reviewed. Five propositions suggesting ways accounting educators can make use of CLS and associated measures to help students ‘learn how to learn' are developed and recommendations for future research are offered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-52
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Accounting Education
Volume22
Issue number1
Early online date27 Nov 2003
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Nov 2003

Keywords

  • Cognitive learning styles
  • Cognitive information processing models
  • Students' approach to learning
  • Learning how to learn

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of cognitive learning styles in accounting education: developing learning competencies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this