The Quality of Discussion on the Economy in UK Political Blogs in 2008

John W. Robertson, Elizabeth McLaughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the early years of the twenty-first century, things look bleak for the political journalists of large newspapers-squeezed by the demands of celebrity culture, bullied by politicians and their aides, untrusted by the public and, now, displaced by a horde of amateur bloggers-or do they? This study is based upon an in-depth, comparative analysis of the quality of debate, on economic issues, in a selection of the UK's most popular, 'independent', political blogs and of their equivalents hosted by established newspaper writers and suggests a much more positive prognosis for the future of professional political journalists and, more importantly, for the public sphere, than has been commonly asserted elsewhere.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-128
JournalParliamentary Affairs
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • child employment
  • ethnicity
  • part-time job
  • school students' work
  • work and school
  • gender

Cite this

@article{8e52293b92d3461eb9255d6efd7471e8,
title = "The Quality of Discussion on the Economy in UK Political Blogs in 2008",
abstract = "In the early years of the twenty-first century, things look bleak for the political journalists of large newspapers-squeezed by the demands of celebrity culture, bullied by politicians and their aides, untrusted by the public and, now, displaced by a horde of amateur bloggers-or do they? This study is based upon an in-depth, comparative analysis of the quality of debate, on economic issues, in a selection of the UK's most popular, 'independent', political blogs and of their equivalents hosted by established newspaper writers and suggests a much more positive prognosis for the future of professional political journalists and, more importantly, for the public sphere, than has been commonly asserted elsewhere.",
keywords = "child employment, ethnicity, part-time job, school students' work, work and school , gender",
author = "Robertson, {John W.} and Elizabeth McLaughlin",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1093/pa/gsq014",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "106--128",
journal = "Parliamentary Affairs",
issn = "0031-2290",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

The Quality of Discussion on the Economy in UK Political Blogs in 2008. / Robertson, John W.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth.

In: Parliamentary Affairs, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 106-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Quality of Discussion on the Economy in UK Political Blogs in 2008

AU - Robertson, John W.

AU - McLaughlin, Elizabeth

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - In the early years of the twenty-first century, things look bleak for the political journalists of large newspapers-squeezed by the demands of celebrity culture, bullied by politicians and their aides, untrusted by the public and, now, displaced by a horde of amateur bloggers-or do they? This study is based upon an in-depth, comparative analysis of the quality of debate, on economic issues, in a selection of the UK's most popular, 'independent', political blogs and of their equivalents hosted by established newspaper writers and suggests a much more positive prognosis for the future of professional political journalists and, more importantly, for the public sphere, than has been commonly asserted elsewhere.

AB - In the early years of the twenty-first century, things look bleak for the political journalists of large newspapers-squeezed by the demands of celebrity culture, bullied by politicians and their aides, untrusted by the public and, now, displaced by a horde of amateur bloggers-or do they? This study is based upon an in-depth, comparative analysis of the quality of debate, on economic issues, in a selection of the UK's most popular, 'independent', political blogs and of their equivalents hosted by established newspaper writers and suggests a much more positive prognosis for the future of professional political journalists and, more importantly, for the public sphere, than has been commonly asserted elsewhere.

KW - child employment

KW - ethnicity

KW - part-time job

KW - school students' work

KW - work and school

KW - gender

U2 - 10.1093/pa/gsq014

DO - 10.1093/pa/gsq014

M3 - Article

VL - 64

SP - 106

EP - 128

JO - Parliamentary Affairs

JF - Parliamentary Affairs

SN - 0031-2290

IS - 1

ER -