The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

‘The Antiques Road Trip’ is an example of Francis Bonner’s Ordinary Television.

Produced by STV in Glasgow, it is broadcast as part of BBC1’s Daytime schedule. The fact that 230 shows have been made is testament to its enduring popularity.

The show has played an important role in reviving the economic fortunes of STV. The returnable daytime format is often seen as the ‘Holy Grail’ for a TV Production company, providing predictable income over a fixed period. It earns STV a significant amount of income and, at peak, employs more than 80 production staff.

Technically, it is a logistical challenge, requiring sophisticated use of file- based capture and a tapeless post-production process. It is made to tight budgets, employing ‘new’ types of production personnel - data wranglers, self-shooting producer/directors and edit producers. Produced to a recognisable format, each programme requires creative thought and skilful story telling.

This study uses interviews with key production personnel working on the programme coupled with practice-based expertise to inform the debate as to how (and why) this style of TV is made.

This paper will reveal the programmes makers thoughts on the appeal of The Antiques Road Trip, the significant elements of its format points and the keys to its successful production. It will also discuss the importance of the show to the business of STV and the place of such ‘ordinary television’ in Scottish, UK and global TV production.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventMedia, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014 - Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Jan 201410 Jan 2014
https://meccsa2014.bournemouth.ac.uk/

Conference

ConferenceMedia, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014
Abbreviated titleMeCCSA 2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBournemouth
Period8/01/1410/01/14
Internet address

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television
road
producer
personnel data
income
production process
broadcast
popularity
director
appeal
personnel
budget
expertise
staff
interview
economics

Cite this

Tucker, P. (2014). The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television. Paper presented at Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.
Tucker, Paul. / The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television. Paper presented at Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.
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Tucker, P 2014, 'The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television' Paper presented at Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014, Bournemouth, United Kingdom, 8/01/14 - 10/01/14, .

The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television. / Tucker, Paul.

2014. Paper presented at Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Tucker P. The Making of The Antiques Road Trip - producing 'ordinary' television. 2014. Paper presented at Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association Annual Conference 2014, Bournemouth, United Kingdom.