The kinematics and kinetics analysis of the lower extremity in the landing phase of a stop-jump task

L. Yin, D. Sun, Q.C. Mei, Y.D. Gu, Julien Baker, N. Feng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large number of studies showed that landing with great impact forces may be a risk factor for knee injuries. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the different landing loads to lower extremity of both genders and examine the relationships among selected lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during the landing of a stop-jump task. A total of 35 male and 35 female healthy subjects were recruited in this study. Each subject executed five experiment actions. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were synchronously acquired. The comparison of lower extremity kinematics for different genders showed significant difference. The knee and hip maximum flexion angle, peak ground reaction force and peak knee extension moment have significantly decreased during the landing of the stop-jump task among the female subjects. The hip flexion angle at the initial foot contact phase showed significant correlation with peak ground reaction force during landing of the stop-jump task (r=-0.927, p<0.001). The knee flexion angle at the initial foot contact phase had significant correlation with peak ground reaction force and vertical ground reaction forces during landing of the stop-jump task (r=-0.908, p<0.001; r=0.812, P=0.002). A large hip and knee flexion angles at the initial foot contact with the ground did not necessarily reduce the impact force during landing, but active hip and knee flexion motions did. The hip and knee flexion motion of landing was an important technical factor that affects anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during the landing of the stop-jump task.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalThe Open Biomedical Engineering Journal
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2015

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