The influence of a soccer season on non-contact injury and isokinetic peak torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings in professional youth soccer players

Colin Charles Brow*, Andisheh Bakhshi, Russ Wrigely, Viswanath B Unnithan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Isokinetic strength screening is utilized in professional soccer. However, there has been little research on the interaction between seasonal changes in players' peak torque (PT) and injury incidence. Twenty-five (age 16.5[Formula: see text]0.68 years) professional youth soccer players participated in the study. Bilateral isokinetic concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) testing of Quadriceps (Q) and Hamstrings (H) were conducted at three time-points across the season. Absolute CON and ECC PT were measured at 60 degree/sec and in a supine 170-degree position. Testing data was normalized to body mass. A mixed design (2 by 3) repeated measures ANOVA with injury as a co-variate was conducted to evaluate the effect of season and/or limb dominance on PT and injury incidence. With regard to the seasonal variation and injury incidence, an interaction was identified with respect to non-dominant limb (NDL) QCON (p = 0.01) and to a lesser extent the dominant limb (DL) QCON (p = 0.05). The seasonal variation of the PT of the NDL QCON was different between the injured and non-injured individuals. Non-injured individuals, QCON strength increased over the course of the season. While for the Injured players, QCON declined from pre-season to mid-season then increased but never recovered to starting pre-season values.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine
Early online date6 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • injury
  • soccer
  • strength
  • isokinetic
  • non-dominant limb

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