The impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by youth gang members and offenders in the west of Scotland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Concerns about youth gang violence and offending have occurred in developed societies across the globe, and a plethora of youth justice sanctions have arisen in response to this. This article is focused upon an empirical study of 20 young men from socially deprived areas of the west of Scotland, whose involvement in individualized offending emerged from their earlier participation in gang violence. The article explores the impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by the young men and their families. The findings indicate that the sanctions had some limited success in reducing anti-social capital in the young offenders’ lives, particularly when they were complemented by mechanisms for rehabilitation and care. However, when used in isolation the sanctions often failed to build pro-social capital and, in some cases, functioned as an additional social strain conducive to further criminal offending. The article ends with some suggested implications for future youth justice policy decisions, and calls for wider research into the impact of criminal justice sanctions on young offenders and families.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-128
JournalCriminology & Criminal Justice
Volume12
Issue number2
Early online date9 Nov 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • curfews
  • offending
  • social capital
  • strain
  • youth

Cite this

@article{dea000e291384f158207caca76d4752d,
title = "The impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by youth gang members and offenders in the west of Scotland",
abstract = "Concerns about youth gang violence and offending have occurred in developed societies across the globe, and a plethora of youth justice sanctions have arisen in response to this. This article is focused upon an empirical study of 20 young men from socially deprived areas of the west of Scotland, whose involvement in individualized offending emerged from their earlier participation in gang violence. The article explores the impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by the young men and their families. The findings indicate that the sanctions had some limited success in reducing anti-social capital in the young offenders’ lives, particularly when they were complemented by mechanisms for rehabilitation and care. However, when used in isolation the sanctions often failed to build pro-social capital and, in some cases, functioned as an additional social strain conducive to further criminal offending. The article ends with some suggested implications for future youth justice policy decisions, and calls for wider research into the impact of criminal justice sanctions on young offenders and families.",
keywords = "curfews, offending, social capital, strain, youth",
author = "Ross Deuchar",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1177/1748895811425540",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "113--128",
journal = "Criminology & Criminal Justice",
issn = "1748-8958",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by youth gang members and offenders in the west of Scotland

AU - Deuchar, Ross

PY - 2012/4

Y1 - 2012/4

N2 - Concerns about youth gang violence and offending have occurred in developed societies across the globe, and a plethora of youth justice sanctions have arisen in response to this. This article is focused upon an empirical study of 20 young men from socially deprived areas of the west of Scotland, whose involvement in individualized offending emerged from their earlier participation in gang violence. The article explores the impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by the young men and their families. The findings indicate that the sanctions had some limited success in reducing anti-social capital in the young offenders’ lives, particularly when they were complemented by mechanisms for rehabilitation and care. However, when used in isolation the sanctions often failed to build pro-social capital and, in some cases, functioned as an additional social strain conducive to further criminal offending. The article ends with some suggested implications for future youth justice policy decisions, and calls for wider research into the impact of criminal justice sanctions on young offenders and families.

AB - Concerns about youth gang violence and offending have occurred in developed societies across the globe, and a plethora of youth justice sanctions have arisen in response to this. This article is focused upon an empirical study of 20 young men from socially deprived areas of the west of Scotland, whose involvement in individualized offending emerged from their earlier participation in gang violence. The article explores the impact of curfews and electronic monitoring on the social strains, support and capital experienced by the young men and their families. The findings indicate that the sanctions had some limited success in reducing anti-social capital in the young offenders’ lives, particularly when they were complemented by mechanisms for rehabilitation and care. However, when used in isolation the sanctions often failed to build pro-social capital and, in some cases, functioned as an additional social strain conducive to further criminal offending. The article ends with some suggested implications for future youth justice policy decisions, and calls for wider research into the impact of criminal justice sanctions on young offenders and families.

KW - curfews

KW - offending

KW - social capital

KW - strain

KW - youth

U2 - 10.1177/1748895811425540

DO - 10.1177/1748895811425540

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 113

EP - 128

JO - Criminology & Criminal Justice

JF - Criminology & Criminal Justice

SN - 1748-8958

IS - 2

ER -