The Green Agenda: why the provision and development of Gypsy/Traveller sites in Scotland is a health hazard as much as an accommodation priority'

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Abstract

Issues of environmental justice regarding housing and other public services have been subjected to critical scrutiny in Scotland for some time (Dunion, 2003; Todd and Zografos, 2005; Slater and Pedersen, 2009). However, such concerns have not focused on Gypsy/Traveller communities and their accommodation on Local Authority and private sites. Politically, the Scottish National Party (SNP) and the Scottish Greens have been in favour of providing site/pitch upgrades, including developing new site locations. These suggestions have been controversial, and reactions have been debated, not least by local councillors and the media. Drawing on the work of Kristeva (1982) and Tyler (2013), this paper argues that
one explanation for understanding responses to Gypsy/Traveller sites is the concept of (social) abjection. When examining local contexts, spatial locations, and environmental circumstances of Local Authority sites, much work is still to be done in challenging instances of environmental injustice and anti-Gypsy/Traveller prejudice in Scotland.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalSocial Policy and Society
Early online date16 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Feb 2024

Keywords

  • abjection
  • accomodation
  • environmental justice
  • gypsy/travellers
  • Scotland
  • traveller sites

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