The effects of prolonged darkness on temperate and tropical marine phytoplankton, and their implications for ballast water risk management

K.J. Carney, J.E. Delany, S. Sawant, E. Mesbahi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Phytoplankton assemblages from tropical (Goa) and temperate (UK) locations were exposed to a 28 day dark period, followed by a period of re-exposure to light. During this time phytoplankton survival and changes in nutrient concentrations were mapped. The tropical plankton water samples showed high nutrient levels after the dark period which were utilised by cells during the re-exposure period. UK experiments looked at the effect of three different water types on population recovery after the 28 day dark period, and differences due to seasonal effects. The population growth observed during the re-exposure period in the tropical population was comparable to that of the temperate population. Water type affected recovery and of the three tested media fresh seawater promoted the highest levels of growth. Seasonality had a significant influence on species survival. Understanding the effects of all these factors can aid the development of effective risk assessments in ballast water management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1233-44
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

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ballast water
Phytoplankton
risk management
scotophase
Risk management
phytoplankton
Nutrients
exposure duration
Plankton
Water
Recovery
development aid
nutrient
water
Water management
Seawater
water management
Risk assessment
risk assessment
seasonality

Cite this

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abstract = "Phytoplankton assemblages from tropical (Goa) and temperate (UK) locations were exposed to a 28 day dark period, followed by a period of re-exposure to light. During this time phytoplankton survival and changes in nutrient concentrations were mapped. The tropical plankton water samples showed high nutrient levels after the dark period which were utilised by cells during the re-exposure period. UK experiments looked at the effect of three different water types on population recovery after the 28 day dark period, and differences due to seasonal effects. The population growth observed during the re-exposure period in the tropical population was comparable to that of the temperate population. Water type affected recovery and of the three tested media fresh seawater promoted the highest levels of growth. Seasonality had a significant influence on species survival. Understanding the effects of all these factors can aid the development of effective risk assessments in ballast water management.",
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The effects of prolonged darkness on temperate and tropical marine phytoplankton, and their implications for ballast water risk management. / Carney, K.J.; Delany, J.E.; Sawant, S.; Mesbahi, E.

In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, Vol. 62, No. 6, 2011, p. 1233-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The effects of prolonged darkness on temperate and tropical marine phytoplankton, and their implications for ballast water risk management

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