The effects of microplastic on freshwater Hydra attenuata feeding, morphology & reproduction

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Abstract

Microplastic pollution has been a growing concern in the aquatic environment for several years. Much of the research on microplastic pollution has focused on the marine environment and species with little research undertaken in freshwater. Here we examine the effect of microplastics on the freshwater cnidarian, Hydra attenuata. This study also describes the development and use of a bioassay to investigate the impact of microplastic on freshwater organisms. Hydra attenuata play a vital role in the planktonic make up of slow moving freshwater bodies which they inhabit and are sensitive environmental indicators. Hydra attenuata were exposed to polyethylene flakes (< 400 μm) extracted from facewash at different concentrations (Control, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 g mL-1). The ecologically relevant endpoint of feeding was measured by determining the amount of prey consumed (Artemia salina) after 30 and 60 min. The amount of microplastics ingested was also recorded at 30 min and 60 min. After which Hydra attenuata were transferred to clean media and observed after 3, 24, 48 & 96 hrs with changes in their morphology and reproduction (Hydranth numbers) recorded. The results of this study show that Hydra attenuata are capable of ingesting microplastics, with several individuals completely filling their gastric cavities. Significant reductions in feeding rates were observed after 30 min in 0.02 & 0.08 g mL-1 and after 60 min in 0.04 & 0.08 g mL-1 exposures. Exposure to the microplastics caused significant changes to the morphology of Hydra attenuata, however these changes were nonlethal. This study demonstrates that freshwater Hydra attenuata is capable of ingesting microplastics and that microplastic can significantly impact the feeding of freshwater organisms.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-494
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume234
Early online date21 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

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Hydra
Fresh Water
Reproduction
Pollution
Bioassay
Polyethylene
Polyethylenes
Cnidaria
Artemia
Research
Biological Assay
Stomach

Keywords

  • Microplastic
  • Hydra attenuata
  • Freshwater
  • Feeding
  • Morphology

Cite this

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abstract = "Microplastic pollution has been a growing concern in the aquatic environment for several years. Much of the research on microplastic pollution has focused on the marine environment and species with little research undertaken in freshwater. Here we examine the effect of microplastics on the freshwater cnidarian, Hydra attenuata. This study also describes the development and use of a bioassay to investigate the impact of microplastic on freshwater organisms. Hydra attenuata play a vital role in the planktonic make up of slow moving freshwater bodies which they inhabit and are sensitive environmental indicators. Hydra attenuata were exposed to polyethylene flakes (< 400 μm) extracted from facewash at different concentrations (Control, 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 g mL-1). The ecologically relevant endpoint of feeding was measured by determining the amount of prey consumed (Artemia salina) after 30 and 60 min. The amount of microplastics ingested was also recorded at 30 min and 60 min. After which Hydra attenuata were transferred to clean media and observed after 3, 24, 48 & 96 hrs with changes in their morphology and reproduction (Hydranth numbers) recorded. The results of this study show that Hydra attenuata are capable of ingesting microplastics, with several individuals completely filling their gastric cavities. Significant reductions in feeding rates were observed after 30 min in 0.02 & 0.08 g mL-1 and after 60 min in 0.04 & 0.08 g mL-1 exposures. Exposure to the microplastics caused significant changes to the morphology of Hydra attenuata, however these changes were nonlethal. This study demonstrates that freshwater Hydra attenuata is capable of ingesting microplastics and that microplastic can significantly impact the feeding of freshwater organisms.",
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The effects of microplastic on freshwater Hydra attenuata feeding, morphology & reproduction. / Murphy, Fionn; Quinn, Brian.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 234, 01.03.2018, p. 487-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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