The effects of cluster-set and traditional-set post activation potentiation protocols on vertical jump performance: cluster sets enhance PAP protocols

Antonio Dello Iacono, Marco Beato, Israel Halperin

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Abstract

Purpose
To compare the effects of two post-activation potentiation (PAP) protocols using traditional or cluster-set configurations on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance.

Methods
Twenty-six male basketball-players completed three testing sessions separate by 72 hours. On the first session, subjects performed barbell jump squats with progressively heavier loads to determine their individual optimum power loads (OPL). On the second and third sessions, subjects completed two PAP protocols in a randomized order: three sets of six repetitions of jump squats using OPL performed with either a traditional (no inter-repetition rest) or a cluster-set (20s rest every two repetitions) configuration. After a warm-up, CMJ height was measured using a force platform before, 30 s, 4-min, and 8-min after completing the PAP protocols. The following kinetic variables were also analyzed and compared: relative impulse, ground reaction force, eccentric displacement, and vertical leg-spring stiffness.

Results
Across both conditions, subjects jumped lower at post-30s by 1.21 cm, and higher in post-4 min by 2.21 cm and in post-8 min by 2.60 cm compared to baseline. However, subjects jumped higher in the cluster condition by 0.71 cm (95%CI: 0.37, 1.05 cm) in post-30 s, 1.33 cm (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65 cm) in post-4 min, and 1.64 cm (95%CI: 1.41, 1.88 cm) in post-8 min. The superior CMJ performance was associated with enhanced kinetic data.

Conclusions
Both protocols induced PAP responses in vertical jump performance using jump squats at OPL. However, the cluster-set configuration led to superior performance across all time points, likely due to reduced muscular fatigue.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Early online date15 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Oct 2019

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Basketball
Muscle Fatigue
Leg

Keywords

  • Ballistic exercise
  • Basketball
  • Explosiveness
  • Neuromuscular capabilities
  • Power

Cite this

@article{57f69d68a51846b7bba04a7bb27f3548,
title = "The effects of cluster-set and traditional-set post activation potentiation protocols on vertical jump performance: cluster sets enhance PAP protocols",
abstract = "PurposeTo compare the effects of two post-activation potentiation (PAP) protocols using traditional or cluster-set configurations on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance.MethodsTwenty-six male basketball-players completed three testing sessions separate by 72 hours. On the first session, subjects performed barbell jump squats with progressively heavier loads to determine their individual optimum power loads (OPL). On the second and third sessions, subjects completed two PAP protocols in a randomized order: three sets of six repetitions of jump squats using OPL performed with either a traditional (no inter-repetition rest) or a cluster-set (20s rest every two repetitions) configuration. After a warm-up, CMJ height was measured using a force platform before, 30 s, 4-min, and 8-min after completing the PAP protocols. The following kinetic variables were also analyzed and compared: relative impulse, ground reaction force, eccentric displacement, and vertical leg-spring stiffness.ResultsAcross both conditions, subjects jumped lower at post-30s by 1.21 cm, and higher in post-4 min by 2.21 cm and in post-8 min by 2.60 cm compared to baseline. However, subjects jumped higher in the cluster condition by 0.71 cm (95{\%}CI: 0.37, 1.05 cm) in post-30 s, 1.33 cm (95{\%}CI: 1.02, 1.65 cm) in post-4 min, and 1.64 cm (95{\%}CI: 1.41, 1.88 cm) in post-8 min. The superior CMJ performance was associated with enhanced kinetic data.ConclusionsBoth protocols induced PAP responses in vertical jump performance using jump squats at OPL. However, the cluster-set configuration led to superior performance across all time points, likely due to reduced muscular fatigue.",
keywords = "Ballistic exercise, Basketball, Explosiveness, Neuromuscular capabilities, Power",
author = "{Dello Iacono}, Antonio and Marco Beato and Israel Halperin",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1123/ijspp.2019-0186",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance",
issn = "1555-0265",
publisher = "Human Kinetics",

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T1 - The effects of cluster-set and traditional-set post activation potentiation protocols on vertical jump performance

T2 - cluster sets enhance PAP protocols

AU - Dello Iacono, Antonio

AU - Beato, Marco

AU - Halperin, Israel

PY - 2019/10/15

Y1 - 2019/10/15

N2 - PurposeTo compare the effects of two post-activation potentiation (PAP) protocols using traditional or cluster-set configurations on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance.MethodsTwenty-six male basketball-players completed three testing sessions separate by 72 hours. On the first session, subjects performed barbell jump squats with progressively heavier loads to determine their individual optimum power loads (OPL). On the second and third sessions, subjects completed two PAP protocols in a randomized order: three sets of six repetitions of jump squats using OPL performed with either a traditional (no inter-repetition rest) or a cluster-set (20s rest every two repetitions) configuration. After a warm-up, CMJ height was measured using a force platform before, 30 s, 4-min, and 8-min after completing the PAP protocols. The following kinetic variables were also analyzed and compared: relative impulse, ground reaction force, eccentric displacement, and vertical leg-spring stiffness.ResultsAcross both conditions, subjects jumped lower at post-30s by 1.21 cm, and higher in post-4 min by 2.21 cm and in post-8 min by 2.60 cm compared to baseline. However, subjects jumped higher in the cluster condition by 0.71 cm (95%CI: 0.37, 1.05 cm) in post-30 s, 1.33 cm (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65 cm) in post-4 min, and 1.64 cm (95%CI: 1.41, 1.88 cm) in post-8 min. The superior CMJ performance was associated with enhanced kinetic data.ConclusionsBoth protocols induced PAP responses in vertical jump performance using jump squats at OPL. However, the cluster-set configuration led to superior performance across all time points, likely due to reduced muscular fatigue.

AB - PurposeTo compare the effects of two post-activation potentiation (PAP) protocols using traditional or cluster-set configurations on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance.MethodsTwenty-six male basketball-players completed three testing sessions separate by 72 hours. On the first session, subjects performed barbell jump squats with progressively heavier loads to determine their individual optimum power loads (OPL). On the second and third sessions, subjects completed two PAP protocols in a randomized order: three sets of six repetitions of jump squats using OPL performed with either a traditional (no inter-repetition rest) or a cluster-set (20s rest every two repetitions) configuration. After a warm-up, CMJ height was measured using a force platform before, 30 s, 4-min, and 8-min after completing the PAP protocols. The following kinetic variables were also analyzed and compared: relative impulse, ground reaction force, eccentric displacement, and vertical leg-spring stiffness.ResultsAcross both conditions, subjects jumped lower at post-30s by 1.21 cm, and higher in post-4 min by 2.21 cm and in post-8 min by 2.60 cm compared to baseline. However, subjects jumped higher in the cluster condition by 0.71 cm (95%CI: 0.37, 1.05 cm) in post-30 s, 1.33 cm (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65 cm) in post-4 min, and 1.64 cm (95%CI: 1.41, 1.88 cm) in post-8 min. The superior CMJ performance was associated with enhanced kinetic data.ConclusionsBoth protocols induced PAP responses in vertical jump performance using jump squats at OPL. However, the cluster-set configuration led to superior performance across all time points, likely due to reduced muscular fatigue.

KW - Ballistic exercise

KW - Basketball

KW - Explosiveness

KW - Neuromuscular capabilities

KW - Power

U2 - 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0186

DO - 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0186

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

SN - 1555-0265

ER -