The effect of kinesiotaping on functional performance in chronic ankle instability: preliminary study

David Hettle, Linda Linton, Julien Baker, Orna Donoghue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

ObjectiveChronic Ankle Instability (CAI) is characterised by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in CAI is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to chronically unstable ankles improved performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT).
DesignCrossover design study with participants randomised to the taped or untaped condition first.
SettingLab-based study.
ParticipantsSixteen participants (10 female, 6 male; age 22.4 ± 1.41 years; height 1.77 ±0 .08 m; weight 71.9 ± 8.7 kg) from university sports clubs participated in the study. Inclusion criteria was a lateral ankle sprain in the previous year, self-reported history of CAI and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score <24.
InterventionKinesiotape was applied to the affected ankles using an adapted form of the lateral sprain technique and participants waited 20 minutes after application or removal before testing.
Main Outcome MeasuresReach distances were measured in antero-medial, medial and postero medial directions of the SEBT in taped and untaped conditions.
ResultsThere were no significant differences in reach distance in any direction of the SEBT between taped and untaped conditions (p>0.05).
ConclusionKinesiotape did not improve reach distance in the SEBT in young, active individuals with CAI. Further research examining the therapeutic effectiveness of Kinesiotape in CAI is warranted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Research on Foot & Ankle
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 May 2013

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Athletic Tape
Ankle
Ankle Injuries
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Proprioception
Myalgia
Sports
Weights and Measures

Cite this

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abstract = "ObjectiveChronic Ankle Instability (CAI) is characterised by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in CAI is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to chronically unstable ankles improved performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT).DesignCrossover design study with participants randomised to the taped or untaped condition first.SettingLab-based study.ParticipantsSixteen participants (10 female, 6 male; age 22.4 ± 1.41 years; height 1.77 ±0 .08 m; weight 71.9 ± 8.7 kg) from university sports clubs participated in the study. Inclusion criteria was a lateral ankle sprain in the previous year, self-reported history of CAI and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score <24.InterventionKinesiotape was applied to the affected ankles using an adapted form of the lateral sprain technique and participants waited 20 minutes after application or removal before testing.Main Outcome MeasuresReach distances were measured in antero-medial, medial and postero medial directions of the SEBT in taped and untaped conditions.ResultsThere were no significant differences in reach distance in any direction of the SEBT between taped and untaped conditions (p>0.05).ConclusionKinesiotape did not improve reach distance in the SEBT in young, active individuals with CAI. Further research examining the therapeutic effectiveness of Kinesiotape in CAI is warranted.",
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The effect of kinesiotaping on functional performance in chronic ankle instability : preliminary study. / Hettle, David; Linton, Linda; Baker, Julien; Donoghue, Orna.

In: Clinical Research on Foot & Ankle, Vol. 1, No. 1, 06.05.2013, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - ObjectiveChronic Ankle Instability (CAI) is characterised by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in CAI is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to chronically unstable ankles improved performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT).DesignCrossover design study with participants randomised to the taped or untaped condition first.SettingLab-based study.ParticipantsSixteen participants (10 female, 6 male; age 22.4 ± 1.41 years; height 1.77 ±0 .08 m; weight 71.9 ± 8.7 kg) from university sports clubs participated in the study. Inclusion criteria was a lateral ankle sprain in the previous year, self-reported history of CAI and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score <24.InterventionKinesiotape was applied to the affected ankles using an adapted form of the lateral sprain technique and participants waited 20 minutes after application or removal before testing.Main Outcome MeasuresReach distances were measured in antero-medial, medial and postero medial directions of the SEBT in taped and untaped conditions.ResultsThere were no significant differences in reach distance in any direction of the SEBT between taped and untaped conditions (p>0.05).ConclusionKinesiotape did not improve reach distance in the SEBT in young, active individuals with CAI. Further research examining the therapeutic effectiveness of Kinesiotape in CAI is warranted.

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