The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years

J.S. Baker, A. Leyshon, M.G. Hughes, Bruce Davies, M. Graham, N.E. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

BackgroundThis study investigated the effect of repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity cycling exercise on the salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A)concentrations of 15-16 year old boys.
MethodsSeventeen apparently healthy schoolchildren (aged 15.5 ± 0.4 years)participated in this study. Stature was measured to the using a portable stadiometer (Holtain Ltd, Crymych, Pembrokeshire, UK). Body mass (BM) was recorded using a Phillips electronic scale (HP 5320). Skinfold measurements were taken with Harpenden skinfold calipers (John Bull, British Indicators Ltd, Bedfordshire, UK). The protocol was performed in triplicate; and triceps and subscapular thicknesses were used to estimate percent body fat (%BF). Fat free mass (FFM) was calculated using the equation BM –(%BF x BM/100). For maturation status, the participants were given a gender-specific questionnaire and asked to complete this in private. All participants completed 6 x 8 secs sprints, interspersed with 30 secs recovery intervals on a cycle ergometer. Participants were harnessed to the ergometer so that they remained seated during the exercise. Toeclips were used to prevent the feet from slipping off the pedals. Using the passive drool method, salivary samples were taken before, and five minutes after, exercise.
ResultsThe group mean for peak power output was 723.1 ± 180.3 watts. One pre exercise association: fat free mass and salivary testosterone (SalT) (p = 0.02); and one post exercise association: average mean power output and SalT (p = 0.03) were identified. There were significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) in both SalT and SalC, five min safter high intensity exercise. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were recorded for SIg(A).
DiscussionThere are few data relating to young people that have examined the effect of repeated bouts of exercise on the immune system. Children playing in uninhibited conditions, frequently exhibit a pattern of short bursts of intense activity interspersed with varying intervals of lower intensity activity. Therefore, an enhanced knowledge of the young body‘s response to such behaviour would be of value. The increases in SalT and SalC reported in this study confirm that repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity exercise produces significant physiological hormonal responses in adolescent boys, but does not affect mucosal immune function.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2009
EventXXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology: Physical Acticity and Exercise for Disabled and Healthy Children - Le Touquet Paris Plage, Paris, France
Duration: 29 Sep 20093 Oct 2009

Conference

ConferenceXXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology
Abbreviated titleChildren and Exercise XXV
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period29/09/093/10/09

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Immunoglobulin A
Hydrocortisone
Testosterone
Exercise
Foot
Fats
Free Association
Adipose Tissue
Immune System

Cite this

Baker, J. S., Leyshon, A., Hughes, M. G., Davies, B., Graham, M., & Thomas, N. E. (2009). The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years. Poster session presented at XXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology, Paris, France.
Baker, J.S. ; Leyshon, A. ; Hughes, M.G. ; Davies, Bruce ; Graham, M. ; Thomas, N.E. / The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years. Poster session presented at XXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology, Paris, France.
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abstract = "BackgroundThis study investigated the effect of repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity cycling exercise on the salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A)concentrations of 15-16 year old boys.MethodsSeventeen apparently healthy schoolchildren (aged 15.5 ± 0.4 years)participated in this study. Stature was measured to the using a portable stadiometer (Holtain Ltd, Crymych, Pembrokeshire, UK). Body mass (BM) was recorded using a Phillips electronic scale (HP 5320). Skinfold measurements were taken with Harpenden skinfold calipers (John Bull, British Indicators Ltd, Bedfordshire, UK). The protocol was performed in triplicate; and triceps and subscapular thicknesses were used to estimate percent body fat ({\%}BF). Fat free mass (FFM) was calculated using the equation BM –({\%}BF x BM/100). For maturation status, the participants were given a gender-specific questionnaire and asked to complete this in private. All participants completed 6 x 8 secs sprints, interspersed with 30 secs recovery intervals on a cycle ergometer. Participants were harnessed to the ergometer so that they remained seated during the exercise. Toeclips were used to prevent the feet from slipping off the pedals. Using the passive drool method, salivary samples were taken before, and five minutes after, exercise.ResultsThe group mean for peak power output was 723.1 ± 180.3 watts. One pre exercise association: fat free mass and salivary testosterone (SalT) (p = 0.02); and one post exercise association: average mean power output and SalT (p = 0.03) were identified. There were significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) in both SalT and SalC, five min safter high intensity exercise. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were recorded for SIg(A).DiscussionThere are few data relating to young people that have examined the effect of repeated bouts of exercise on the immune system. Children playing in uninhibited conditions, frequently exhibit a pattern of short bursts of intense activity interspersed with varying intervals of lower intensity activity. Therefore, an enhanced knowledge of the young body‘s response to such behaviour would be of value. The increases in SalT and SalC reported in this study confirm that repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity exercise produces significant physiological hormonal responses in adolescent boys, but does not affect mucosal immune function.",
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year = "2009",
month = "9",
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Baker, JS, Leyshon, A, Hughes, MG, Davies, B, Graham, M & Thomas, NE 2009, 'The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years' XXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology, Paris, France, 29/09/09 - 3/10/09, .

The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years. / Baker, J.S.; Leyshon, A.; Hughes, M.G.; Davies, Bruce; Graham, M.; Thomas, N.E.

2009. Poster session presented at XXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology, Paris, France.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years

AU - Baker, J.S.

AU - Leyshon, A.

AU - Hughes, M.G.

AU - Davies, Bruce

AU - Graham, M.

AU - Thomas, N.E.

PY - 2009/9/29

Y1 - 2009/9/29

N2 - BackgroundThis study investigated the effect of repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity cycling exercise on the salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A)concentrations of 15-16 year old boys.MethodsSeventeen apparently healthy schoolchildren (aged 15.5 ± 0.4 years)participated in this study. Stature was measured to the using a portable stadiometer (Holtain Ltd, Crymych, Pembrokeshire, UK). Body mass (BM) was recorded using a Phillips electronic scale (HP 5320). Skinfold measurements were taken with Harpenden skinfold calipers (John Bull, British Indicators Ltd, Bedfordshire, UK). The protocol was performed in triplicate; and triceps and subscapular thicknesses were used to estimate percent body fat (%BF). Fat free mass (FFM) was calculated using the equation BM –(%BF x BM/100). For maturation status, the participants were given a gender-specific questionnaire and asked to complete this in private. All participants completed 6 x 8 secs sprints, interspersed with 30 secs recovery intervals on a cycle ergometer. Participants were harnessed to the ergometer so that they remained seated during the exercise. Toeclips were used to prevent the feet from slipping off the pedals. Using the passive drool method, salivary samples were taken before, and five minutes after, exercise.ResultsThe group mean for peak power output was 723.1 ± 180.3 watts. One pre exercise association: fat free mass and salivary testosterone (SalT) (p = 0.02); and one post exercise association: average mean power output and SalT (p = 0.03) were identified. There were significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) in both SalT and SalC, five min safter high intensity exercise. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were recorded for SIg(A).DiscussionThere are few data relating to young people that have examined the effect of repeated bouts of exercise on the immune system. Children playing in uninhibited conditions, frequently exhibit a pattern of short bursts of intense activity interspersed with varying intervals of lower intensity activity. Therefore, an enhanced knowledge of the young body‘s response to such behaviour would be of value. The increases in SalT and SalC reported in this study confirm that repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity exercise produces significant physiological hormonal responses in adolescent boys, but does not affect mucosal immune function.

AB - BackgroundThis study investigated the effect of repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity cycling exercise on the salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A)concentrations of 15-16 year old boys.MethodsSeventeen apparently healthy schoolchildren (aged 15.5 ± 0.4 years)participated in this study. Stature was measured to the using a portable stadiometer (Holtain Ltd, Crymych, Pembrokeshire, UK). Body mass (BM) was recorded using a Phillips electronic scale (HP 5320). Skinfold measurements were taken with Harpenden skinfold calipers (John Bull, British Indicators Ltd, Bedfordshire, UK). The protocol was performed in triplicate; and triceps and subscapular thicknesses were used to estimate percent body fat (%BF). Fat free mass (FFM) was calculated using the equation BM –(%BF x BM/100). For maturation status, the participants were given a gender-specific questionnaire and asked to complete this in private. All participants completed 6 x 8 secs sprints, interspersed with 30 secs recovery intervals on a cycle ergometer. Participants were harnessed to the ergometer so that they remained seated during the exercise. Toeclips were used to prevent the feet from slipping off the pedals. Using the passive drool method, salivary samples were taken before, and five minutes after, exercise.ResultsThe group mean for peak power output was 723.1 ± 180.3 watts. One pre exercise association: fat free mass and salivary testosterone (SalT) (p = 0.02); and one post exercise association: average mean power output and SalT (p = 0.03) were identified. There were significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) in both SalT and SalC, five min safter high intensity exercise. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were recorded for SIg(A).DiscussionThere are few data relating to young people that have examined the effect of repeated bouts of exercise on the immune system. Children playing in uninhibited conditions, frequently exhibit a pattern of short bursts of intense activity interspersed with varying intervals of lower intensity activity. Therefore, an enhanced knowledge of the young body‘s response to such behaviour would be of value. The increases in SalT and SalC reported in this study confirm that repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity exercise produces significant physiological hormonal responses in adolescent boys, but does not affect mucosal immune function.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Baker JS, Leyshon A, Hughes MG, Davies B, Graham M, Thomas NE. The effect of anaerobic exercise on salivary cortisol, testosterone and immunoglobulin (A) in boys aged 15- 16 years. 2009. Poster session presented at XXVth International Symposium of Pediatric Work Physiology, Paris, France.