The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game

Elizabeth Boyle, Thomas Allan, Janet Moffett, Thomas Connolly, Joanne Lawrie, Nicholas Wilson, Hamid Oudi, Atta Badii, Sif Einarsdóttir, Hans Hummel, Aurel Graur

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions that a young person makes, and it is increasingly recognised that having a better understanding of careers and career management skills can help to improve the attainment of young people by reducing the risk of dropping out of school early and leading to more positive career outcomes. The Youth@Work game addresses this by supporting young people between the ages of 13-19 years in career planning. The main benefit of using a game-based approach in this area is that a game provides an active and engaging approach to supporting young people in making these complex and difficult decisions.
The current paper describes a case study of the design and development of a game, the Youth@work game, to support career planning, from the initial ideas to the working game and explains how theories of theories of career development and choice were used to specify learning outcomes in the game.
We will describe how the career competences required for the game were identified and operationalised and how these were implemented as learning outcomes in the game. The two main theoretical frameworks that were used to characterize the desired learning outcomes for the game were: (a) the Skills Development Scotland (SDS) model of career competences and (b) Holland’s model of vocational interests. The SDS model provided a useful organisational framework for the game and both models helped to specify the varied activities in the different zones of the game. The scoring system and feedback are described as well as difficulties that emerged in game design and development as these can provide valuable lessons about general issues that arise in designing games for learning.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning
EditorsThomas Connolly, Liz Boyle
Place of PublicationReading
PublisherAcademic Conferences and Publishing International
ISBN (Electronic)978‐1‐911218‐10‐4
ISBN (Print)978-1-911218-09-8
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016

Publication series

Name
PublisherAcademic Conferences and Publishing International
ISSN (Print)2049-0992
ISSN (Electronic)2049-100X

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Boyle, E., Allan, T., Moffett, J., Connolly, T., Lawrie, J., Wilson, N., ... Graur, A. (2016). The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game. In T. Connolly, & L. Boyle (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning Reading: Academic Conferences and Publishing International.
Boyle, Elizabeth ; Allan, Thomas ; Moffett, Janet ; Connolly, Thomas ; Lawrie, Joanne ; Wilson, Nicholas ; Oudi, Hamid ; Badii, Atta ; Einarsdóttir, Sif ; Hummel, Hans ; Graur, Aurel . / The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game. Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning. editor / Thomas Connolly ; Liz Boyle. Reading : Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2016.
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abstract = "Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions that a young person makes, and it is increasingly recognised that having a better understanding of careers and career management skills can help to improve the attainment of young people by reducing the risk of dropping out of school early and leading to more positive career outcomes. The Youth@Work game addresses this by supporting young people between the ages of 13-19 years in career planning. The main benefit of using a game-based approach in this area is that a game provides an active and engaging approach to supporting young people in making these complex and difficult decisions. The current paper describes a case study of the design and development of a game, the Youth@work game, to support career planning, from the initial ideas to the working game and explains how theories of theories of career development and choice were used to specify learning outcomes in the game.We will describe how the career competences required for the game were identified and operationalised and how these were implemented as learning outcomes in the game. The two main theoretical frameworks that were used to characterize the desired learning outcomes for the game were: (a) the Skills Development Scotland (SDS) model of career competences and (b) Holland’s model of vocational interests. The SDS model provided a useful organisational framework for the game and both models helped to specify the varied activities in the different zones of the game. The scoring system and feedback are described as well as difficulties that emerged in game design and development as these can provide valuable lessons about general issues that arise in designing games for learning.",
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Boyle, E, Allan, T, Moffett, J, Connolly, T, Lawrie, J, Wilson, N, Oudi, H, Badii, A, Einarsdóttir, S, Hummel, H & Graur, A 2016, The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game. in T Connolly & L Boyle (eds), Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning. Academic Conferences and Publishing International, Reading.

The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game. / Boyle, Elizabeth; Allan, Thomas; Moffett, Janet; Connolly, Thomas; Lawrie, Joanne; Wilson, Nicholas; Oudi, Hamid; Badii, Atta; Einarsdóttir, Sif; Hummel, Hans; Graur, Aurel .

Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning. ed. / Thomas Connolly; Liz Boyle. Reading : Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Allan, Thomas

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AU - Connolly, Thomas

AU - Lawrie, Joanne

AU - Wilson, Nicholas

AU - Oudi, Hamid

AU - Badii, Atta

AU - Einarsdóttir, Sif

AU - Hummel, Hans

AU - Graur, Aurel

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N2 - Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions that a young person makes, and it is increasingly recognised that having a better understanding of careers and career management skills can help to improve the attainment of young people by reducing the risk of dropping out of school early and leading to more positive career outcomes. The Youth@Work game addresses this by supporting young people between the ages of 13-19 years in career planning. The main benefit of using a game-based approach in this area is that a game provides an active and engaging approach to supporting young people in making these complex and difficult decisions. The current paper describes a case study of the design and development of a game, the Youth@work game, to support career planning, from the initial ideas to the working game and explains how theories of theories of career development and choice were used to specify learning outcomes in the game.We will describe how the career competences required for the game were identified and operationalised and how these were implemented as learning outcomes in the game. The two main theoretical frameworks that were used to characterize the desired learning outcomes for the game were: (a) the Skills Development Scotland (SDS) model of career competences and (b) Holland’s model of vocational interests. The SDS model provided a useful organisational framework for the game and both models helped to specify the varied activities in the different zones of the game. The scoring system and feedback are described as well as difficulties that emerged in game design and development as these can provide valuable lessons about general issues that arise in designing games for learning.

AB - Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions that a young person makes, and it is increasingly recognised that having a better understanding of careers and career management skills can help to improve the attainment of young people by reducing the risk of dropping out of school early and leading to more positive career outcomes. The Youth@Work game addresses this by supporting young people between the ages of 13-19 years in career planning. The main benefit of using a game-based approach in this area is that a game provides an active and engaging approach to supporting young people in making these complex and difficult decisions. The current paper describes a case study of the design and development of a game, the Youth@work game, to support career planning, from the initial ideas to the working game and explains how theories of theories of career development and choice were used to specify learning outcomes in the game.We will describe how the career competences required for the game were identified and operationalised and how these were implemented as learning outcomes in the game. The two main theoretical frameworks that were used to characterize the desired learning outcomes for the game were: (a) the Skills Development Scotland (SDS) model of career competences and (b) Holland’s model of vocational interests. The SDS model provided a useful organisational framework for the game and both models helped to specify the varied activities in the different zones of the game. The scoring system and feedback are described as well as difficulties that emerged in game design and development as these can provide valuable lessons about general issues that arise in designing games for learning.

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SN - 978-1-911218-09-8

BT - Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning

A2 - Connolly, Thomas

A2 - Boyle, Liz

PB - Academic Conferences and Publishing International

CY - Reading

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Boyle E, Allan T, Moffett J, Connolly T, Lawrie J, Wilson N et al. The Design and Development of the YOUTH@WORK game. In Connolly T, Boyle L, editors, Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning. Reading: Academic Conferences and Publishing International. 2016