Testosterone in older men: effect of exercise

Lawrence D. Hayes, Nicholas Sculthorpe, Peter Herbert, Julien S. Baker, Dewi Reed, Liam P. Kilduff, Fergal M. Grace

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Advancing age in men is associated with a progressive decline in serum testosterone (T) and interactions between exercise, aging, and androgen status are only partially understood.PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to establish the influence of lifelong training history on serum T, cortisol (C), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in aging men.METHODS: Serum T, C, and SHBG were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and compared between two distinct groups consisting lifelong exercising males (LE [n=20], 60.4 ± 4.7 yr) and age matched lifelong sedentary individuals (SED [n=28], 62.5 ± 5.3 years).RESULTS: T-test revealed a lack of significant differences for serum C or SHBG between LE and SED, whilst Mann-Whitney U revealed no difference in total T, bioavailable T, or free T. ANOVA revealed significant exercise induced increases in aerobic capacity, serum T and serum SHBG (each p<0.05) but not free T or bioavailable T in the SED group following the intervention.CONCLUSION: Findings from this investigation indicate that resting levels of serum T, and calculated free and bioavailable T do not differ in aging men, irrespective of lifelong exercise history. The present study found small but significant increases in resting levels of systemic T following exercise training in SED. However this may not be available to any exert biological effect as a result of the corresponding increase in the (SHBG) protein fraction, and further supported by the lack of any impact on free T
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26
JournalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Volume47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

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Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Testosterone
Exercise
Serum
Serum Globulins
Androgens
Radioimmunoassay
Hydrocortisone
Analysis of Variance
Carrier Proteins
History

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Hayes, L. D., Sculthorpe, N., Herbert, P., Baker, J. S., Reed, D., Kilduff, L. P., & Grace, F. M. (2015). Testosterone in older men: effect of exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 47, 26. https://doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000476465.62871.19
Hayes, Lawrence D. ; Sculthorpe, Nicholas ; Herbert, Peter ; Baker, Julien S. ; Reed, Dewi ; Kilduff, Liam P. ; Grace, Fergal M. / Testosterone in older men : effect of exercise. In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2015 ; Vol. 47. pp. 26.
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abstract = "Advancing age in men is associated with a progressive decline in serum testosterone (T) and interactions between exercise, aging, and androgen status are only partially understood.PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to establish the influence of lifelong training history on serum T, cortisol (C), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in aging men.METHODS: Serum T, C, and SHBG were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and compared between two distinct groups consisting lifelong exercising males (LE [n=20], 60.4 ± 4.7 yr) and age matched lifelong sedentary individuals (SED [n=28], 62.5 ± 5.3 years).RESULTS: T-test revealed a lack of significant differences for serum C or SHBG between LE and SED, whilst Mann-Whitney U revealed no difference in total T, bioavailable T, or free T. ANOVA revealed significant exercise induced increases in aerobic capacity, serum T and serum SHBG (each p<0.05) but not free T or bioavailable T in the SED group following the intervention.CONCLUSION: Findings from this investigation indicate that resting levels of serum T, and calculated free and bioavailable T do not differ in aging men, irrespective of lifelong exercise history. The present study found small but significant increases in resting levels of systemic T following exercise training in SED. However this may not be available to any exert biological effect as a result of the corresponding increase in the (SHBG) protein fraction, and further supported by the lack of any impact on free T",
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Testosterone in older men : effect of exercise. / Hayes, Lawrence D. ; Sculthorpe, Nicholas; Herbert, Peter; Baker, Julien S.; Reed, Dewi; Kilduff, Liam P.; Grace, Fergal M.

In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Vol. 47, 01.05.2015, p. 26.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testosterone in older men

T2 - effect of exercise

AU - Hayes, Lawrence D.

AU - Sculthorpe, Nicholas

AU - Herbert, Peter

AU - Baker, Julien S.

AU - Reed, Dewi

AU - Kilduff, Liam P.

AU - Grace, Fergal M.

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Advancing age in men is associated with a progressive decline in serum testosterone (T) and interactions between exercise, aging, and androgen status are only partially understood.PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to establish the influence of lifelong training history on serum T, cortisol (C), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in aging men.METHODS: Serum T, C, and SHBG were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and compared between two distinct groups consisting lifelong exercising males (LE [n=20], 60.4 ± 4.7 yr) and age matched lifelong sedentary individuals (SED [n=28], 62.5 ± 5.3 years).RESULTS: T-test revealed a lack of significant differences for serum C or SHBG between LE and SED, whilst Mann-Whitney U revealed no difference in total T, bioavailable T, or free T. ANOVA revealed significant exercise induced increases in aerobic capacity, serum T and serum SHBG (each p<0.05) but not free T or bioavailable T in the SED group following the intervention.CONCLUSION: Findings from this investigation indicate that resting levels of serum T, and calculated free and bioavailable T do not differ in aging men, irrespective of lifelong exercise history. The present study found small but significant increases in resting levels of systemic T following exercise training in SED. However this may not be available to any exert biological effect as a result of the corresponding increase in the (SHBG) protein fraction, and further supported by the lack of any impact on free T

AB - Advancing age in men is associated with a progressive decline in serum testosterone (T) and interactions between exercise, aging, and androgen status are only partially understood.PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to establish the influence of lifelong training history on serum T, cortisol (C), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in aging men.METHODS: Serum T, C, and SHBG were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and compared between two distinct groups consisting lifelong exercising males (LE [n=20], 60.4 ± 4.7 yr) and age matched lifelong sedentary individuals (SED [n=28], 62.5 ± 5.3 years).RESULTS: T-test revealed a lack of significant differences for serum C or SHBG between LE and SED, whilst Mann-Whitney U revealed no difference in total T, bioavailable T, or free T. ANOVA revealed significant exercise induced increases in aerobic capacity, serum T and serum SHBG (each p<0.05) but not free T or bioavailable T in the SED group following the intervention.CONCLUSION: Findings from this investigation indicate that resting levels of serum T, and calculated free and bioavailable T do not differ in aging men, irrespective of lifelong exercise history. The present study found small but significant increases in resting levels of systemic T following exercise training in SED. However this may not be available to any exert biological effect as a result of the corresponding increase in the (SHBG) protein fraction, and further supported by the lack of any impact on free T

U2 - 10.1249/01.mss.0000476465.62871.19

DO - 10.1249/01.mss.0000476465.62871.19

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 47

SP - 26

JO - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

JF - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

ER -