Taking control after fall induced hip fracture.

Laura McMillan, Joanne Booth, Kay Currie, Tracey Howe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study sought to understand how older people manage life after hip fracture. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with older people after discharge home, in 2 health board areas in Scotland. Using grounded theory, a core category of ‘taking control’ emerged. The three stages that people moved through in the process of taking control after hip fracture were: ‘going under’, ‘keeping afloat’ and ‘gaining ground’. Nautical metaphors emphasise the precarious and unstable conditions of life after hip fracture, as well as conceptualising the physical and emotional struggles that people faced in ‘balancing’ help and risk. People took control to manage their concerns about losing control and independence in the future. This study highlights that older people are vulnerable to losing control after hip fracture and stresses that healthcare professionals have a vital role to play in facilitating restoration of control and increasing self efficacy.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGenerations Review
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Hip Fractures
Metaphor
Scotland
Self Efficacy
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Cite this

McMillan, L., Booth, J., Currie, K., & Howe, T. (2011). Taking control after fall induced hip fracture. Generations Review, 21(2).
McMillan, Laura ; Booth, Joanne ; Currie, Kay ; Howe, Tracey. / Taking control after fall induced hip fracture. In: Generations Review. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 2.
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McMillan, L, Booth, J, Currie, K & Howe, T 2011, 'Taking control after fall induced hip fracture.' Generations Review, vol. 21, no. 2.

Taking control after fall induced hip fracture. / McMillan, Laura; Booth, Joanne; Currie, Kay; Howe, Tracey.

In: Generations Review, Vol. 21, No. 2, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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