Stereotyping at the undergraduate level revealed during interprofessional learning between future doctors and biomedical scientists

Moira Lewitt, Ewa Ehrenborg, Max Scheja, Annelie Brauner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interprofessional education (IPE) involving undergraduate health professionals is expected to promote collaboration in their later careers. The role of IPE between doctors and biomedical scientists has not been explored at the undergraduate level. Our aim was to introduce IPE sessions for medical and biomedical students in order to identify the benefits and barriers to these groups learning together. Medical and biomedical students together discussed laboratory results, relevant literature, and ideas for developing new diagnostic tools. The programme was evaluated with questionnaires and interviews. While there was general support for the idea of IPE, medical and biomedical students responded differently. Biomedical students were more critical, wanted more explicit learning objectives and felt that their professional role was often misunderstood. The medical students were more enthusiastic but regarded the way the biomedical students communicated concerns about their perceived role as a barrier to effective interprofessional learning. We conclude that stereotyping, which can impede effective collaborations between doctors and biomedical scientists, is already present at the undergraduate level and may be a barrier to IPE. Effective learning opportunities should be supported at the curriculum level and be designed to specifically enable a broad appreciation of each other's future professional roles
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-62
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Interprofessional learning
  • Undergraguate
  • Medical
  • Biomedical science

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