Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas: the case of Scotland

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Work and employment is a complex problem in remote and rural areas, as economic, social and technological change act together to create serious challenges to community sustainability while also enabling positive change. On the supply side smart systems can be the infrastructure and availability of new work and employment, yet the demand side of vision and expectations about new work and employment based on smart systems in remote and rural areas is lagging behind. The challenge is to inspire and share in change and growth through new work enabled by smart systems, and opportunity is the chance to imagine new potential and capabilities around work which help sustain and grow communities in remote and rural areas. This paper considers the case of the Scotland, as the national initiative ‘Digital Scotland’ is rolled out, showing the challenge and focussing on the opportunity.

In Scotland four main themes have been identified . These are connectivity, the digital economy, digital participation and digital public services. The presence of work and employment is seen explicitly in the theme of connectivity, with specific reference to flexible working. It is also seen explicitly in the ‘economy’ theme with relation to changing skills needs. Digital participation is more general, though this includes economic aspects of participation in employment. Digital public services implies an HRM agenda as this is by far the largest sector of employment in Scotland, so change here will impact on digital HRM for the workforce. These will all be reviewed with regard to remote and rural areas use of smart systems to secure new work and employment.

The conclusion is that there is a big gap between plans for providing basic infrastructure and the true potential if the ‘demand side’ of new work and employment is more dynamically imagined with higher aspirations and goals. New work and employment merits a stronger presence and role in how key strategic themes around the digital economy are framed. Otherwise the presence or role for new work and employment, despite the potential, will continue to be unrealised in the future of remote and rural areas. The reasons for this and implications of this are considered. In general take up and demand side options, including digital HRM are not well understood or researched at present. National digital dialogues would benefit from more imaginative thinking on the potential and adoption demands, beyond replicating forms and sites work and employment that currently exist more flexibly. In the organizational work and employment context we need to address rather than subsume smart systems potential in the promotion of ERP and encourage, empower and enable new work and employment as part of dynamic change and more fully realised and augmented smart system futures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages17-17
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2017
Event28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development): Smart Systems for Complex Problems
- University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, United Kingdom
Duration: 11 Sep 201713 Sep 2017
http://iima.org/wp/28th-conference-11-13-sept-2017-paisley-scotland-uk/ (Conference website)

Conference

Conference28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development)
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityPaisley
Period11/09/1713/09/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Rural areas
Scotland
Participation
Digital economy
Public services
Connectivity
Digital options
Sustainability
Supply side
Technological change
Economic change
Flexible working
Workforce
Agenda
Economics
Aspiration

Keywords

  • work and employment
  • remote and rural areas
  • Scotland

Cite this

Gibb, S. (2017). Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas: the case of Scotland . 17-17. Paper presented at 28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development), Paisley, United Kingdom.
Gibb, Stephen. / Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas : the case of Scotland . Paper presented at 28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development), Paisley, United Kingdom.1 p.
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Gibb, S 2017, 'Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas: the case of Scotland ' Paper presented at 28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development), Paisley, United Kingdom, 11/09/17 - 13/09/17, pp. 17-17.

Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas : the case of Scotland . / Gibb, Stephen.

2017. 17-17 Paper presented at 28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development), Paisley, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T1 - Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas

T2 - the case of Scotland

AU - Gibb, Stephen

PY - 2017/9/11

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KW - work and employment

KW - remote and rural areas

KW - Scotland

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EP - 17

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Gibb S. Smart systems and addressing the complex problem of work and employment in remote and rural areas: the case of Scotland . 2017. Paper presented at 28th Annual IIMA (International Information Management Association) and 4th ICITED (International Conference on Information
Technology and Economic Development), Paisley, United Kingdom.