School students’ part‐time work: understanding what they do

James McKechnie, Sandy Hobbs, Amanda Simpson, Seonaid Anderson, Cathy Howieson, Sheila Semple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research has shown that the majority of school students combine full‐time education with part‐time employment. To date educationalists have paid little attention to this, in part due to the negative views about the ‘quality’ of such work and its effect on educational attainment. In this research, a case study approach is used to explore the potential range and breadth of activities carried out by such employees. A range of alternative data‐gathering techniques were used including event recording and work place observations. The findings highlight between job and within job category differences and suggest that many jobs are demanding and can result in skill attainment. The results are discussed in the context of debates about the potential educational value of such employment experiences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-175
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Education and Work
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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area of activity
school
recording
workplace
student
employee
event
Values
education
experience
Education
Employees
Work place
Educational attainment

Cite this

McKechnie, James ; Hobbs, Sandy ; Simpson, Amanda ; Anderson, Seonaid ; Howieson, Cathy ; Semple, Sheila. / School students’ part‐time work : understanding what they do. In: Journal of Education and Work. 2010 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 161-175.
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School students’ part‐time work : understanding what they do. / McKechnie, James; Hobbs, Sandy; Simpson, Amanda; Anderson, Seonaid; Howieson, Cathy; Semple, Sheila.

In: Journal of Education and Work, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2010, p. 161-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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