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Abstract

Background and Aim
Puberty is a critical time in the development of overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between measures of adiposity, physical fitness and cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents.

Subjects and methods
In a cross-sectional study design, 129 girls and 95 boys aged 12.9-14.4 y at various stages of puberty were included, along with their mothers (n=217) and fathers (n=207). Anthropometric assessments of adiposity were made, along with physical fitness and biochemical markers associated with cardiovascular risk.

Results
Waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) values were similar in boys and girls, and correlated positively with glucose, insulin, triglyceride, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein concentrations, and inversely with physical fitness scores. Skinfold-thickness (SKF) measurements were higher in girls. Compared to girls, HMW-adiponectin concentrations were lower in boys, particularly in late puberty, and C-reactive protein levels were higher. Physical fitness, maternal BMI and paternal BMI contributed independently to the variance in waist measurements in girls and boys. Gender, triceps SKF and WHtR, and not parental BMI, contributed independently to the variance in physical fitness.

Conclusion
There is a relationship between measures of adolescent adiposity and parental weight that involves factors other than physical fitness. Adolescent boys have relatively more abdominal fat than girls and a tendency to a proinflammatory profile of biochemical markers. These observations suggest that family and social environmental interventions are best undertaken earlier in childhood, particularly in boys.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sport and Health Science
Early online date15 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Adiposity
Biomarkers
Skinfold Thickness
Puberty
C-Reactive Protein
Mothers
Abdominal Fat
Adiponectin
Fathers
Fibrinogen
Triglycerides
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Insulin
Weights and Measures
Glucose

Keywords

  • cardiovascular risk
  • inflammation
  • physical fitness

Cite this

@article{61d8f6b944044f8fa323be5f093b4d6b,
title = "Relationship between abdominal adiposity, cardiovascular fitness, and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in British adolescents",
abstract = "Background and AimPuberty is a critical time in the development of overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between measures of adiposity, physical fitness and cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents.Subjects and methodsIn a cross-sectional study design, 129 girls and 95 boys aged 12.9-14.4 y at various stages of puberty were included, along with their mothers (n=217) and fathers (n=207). Anthropometric assessments of adiposity were made, along with physical fitness and biochemical markers associated with cardiovascular risk.ResultsWaist-to-height ratio (WHtR) values were similar in boys and girls, and correlated positively with glucose, insulin, triglyceride, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein concentrations, and inversely with physical fitness scores. Skinfold-thickness (SKF) measurements were higher in girls. Compared to girls, HMW-adiponectin concentrations were lower in boys, particularly in late puberty, and C-reactive protein levels were higher. Physical fitness, maternal BMI and paternal BMI contributed independently to the variance in waist measurements in girls and boys. Gender, triceps SKF and WHtR, and not parental BMI, contributed independently to the variance in physical fitness. ConclusionThere is a relationship between measures of adolescent adiposity and parental weight that involves factors other than physical fitness. Adolescent boys have relatively more abdominal fat than girls and a tendency to a proinflammatory profile of biochemical markers. These observations suggest that family and social environmental interventions are best undertaken earlier in childhood, particularly in boys.",
keywords = "cardiovascular risk, inflammation, physical fitness",
author = "Moira Lewitt and Julien Baker",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jshs.2019.02.004",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Sport and Health Science",
issn = "2095-2546",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between abdominal adiposity, cardiovascular fitness, and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in British adolescents

AU - Lewitt, Moira

AU - Baker, Julien

PY - 2019/2/15

Y1 - 2019/2/15

N2 - Background and AimPuberty is a critical time in the development of overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between measures of adiposity, physical fitness and cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents.Subjects and methodsIn a cross-sectional study design, 129 girls and 95 boys aged 12.9-14.4 y at various stages of puberty were included, along with their mothers (n=217) and fathers (n=207). Anthropometric assessments of adiposity were made, along with physical fitness and biochemical markers associated with cardiovascular risk.ResultsWaist-to-height ratio (WHtR) values were similar in boys and girls, and correlated positively with glucose, insulin, triglyceride, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein concentrations, and inversely with physical fitness scores. Skinfold-thickness (SKF) measurements were higher in girls. Compared to girls, HMW-adiponectin concentrations were lower in boys, particularly in late puberty, and C-reactive protein levels were higher. Physical fitness, maternal BMI and paternal BMI contributed independently to the variance in waist measurements in girls and boys. Gender, triceps SKF and WHtR, and not parental BMI, contributed independently to the variance in physical fitness. ConclusionThere is a relationship between measures of adolescent adiposity and parental weight that involves factors other than physical fitness. Adolescent boys have relatively more abdominal fat than girls and a tendency to a proinflammatory profile of biochemical markers. These observations suggest that family and social environmental interventions are best undertaken earlier in childhood, particularly in boys.

AB - Background and AimPuberty is a critical time in the development of overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between measures of adiposity, physical fitness and cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents.Subjects and methodsIn a cross-sectional study design, 129 girls and 95 boys aged 12.9-14.4 y at various stages of puberty were included, along with their mothers (n=217) and fathers (n=207). Anthropometric assessments of adiposity were made, along with physical fitness and biochemical markers associated with cardiovascular risk.ResultsWaist-to-height ratio (WHtR) values were similar in boys and girls, and correlated positively with glucose, insulin, triglyceride, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein concentrations, and inversely with physical fitness scores. Skinfold-thickness (SKF) measurements were higher in girls. Compared to girls, HMW-adiponectin concentrations were lower in boys, particularly in late puberty, and C-reactive protein levels were higher. Physical fitness, maternal BMI and paternal BMI contributed independently to the variance in waist measurements in girls and boys. Gender, triceps SKF and WHtR, and not parental BMI, contributed independently to the variance in physical fitness. ConclusionThere is a relationship between measures of adolescent adiposity and parental weight that involves factors other than physical fitness. Adolescent boys have relatively more abdominal fat than girls and a tendency to a proinflammatory profile of biochemical markers. These observations suggest that family and social environmental interventions are best undertaken earlier in childhood, particularly in boys.

KW - cardiovascular risk

KW - inflammation

KW - physical fitness

U2 - 10.1016/j.jshs.2019.02.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jshs.2019.02.004

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Sport and Health Science

JF - Journal of Sport and Health Science

SN - 2095-2546

ER -