Providing authentic(ated) food: an opportunity-driven framework for small food companies to engage consumers and protect the integrity of the food supply chain

Louise Manning, Robert Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The 2013 horsemeat scandal and other such cases have led consumers to question their trust in extended global food supply chains. The aim of this research is to identify how small and medium-sized rural food retailers maintain food integrity with a market driver for cheaper food and the potential for food fraud. Qualitative interviews with industry insiders and analysis of data from rural food retail stores (n = 20) enabled a conceptual framework to be postulated. Adding value through Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) can deliver product differentiation, but also provides opportunities for food fraud/substitution if there is a large price differential between the niche and the standard product. Therefore value can be added to products by developing associated trust and social capital, but consumers must be safeguarded from making false assumptions on provenance or from potential food criminality and predatory, criminal entrepreneurs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2015

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Food supply
Supply chains
Industry
Retail stores
Integrity
Supply chain
Food
Substitution reactions

Keywords

  • authenticated
  • food
  • fraud
  • integrity
  • small food companies
  • supply

Cite this

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