Progression from cafeteria to à la carte offending: Scottish organised crime narratives

James Densley, Robert McLean, Ross Deuchar, Simon Harding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper presents insights from qualitative research into organised crime (OC) in Glasgow, Scotland. Interviews were conducted with a sample of 42 current and former offenders with a history of group offending in an attempt to understand variation in the onset, maintenance, and cessation of OC careers. Offending narratives revealed different OC trajectories. Drug dealing was the primary modus operandi of OC groups, but some offenders exhibited versatility and progression to wider criminal activity or a mix of illegitimate activity and legitimate business. Implications for future policing strategies and suggested additional research are outlined in response to these findings.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages19
JournalThe Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
Early online date26 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Dec 2018

Fingerprint

organized crime
narrative
offender
qualitative research
Group
career
drug
history
interview

Keywords

  • organised crime
  • drug dealing
  • Scotland
  • criminal capital
  • narratives

Cite this

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Progression from cafeteria to à la carte offending : Scottish organised crime narratives. / Densley, James; McLean, Robert ; Deuchar, Ross; Harding, Simon.

In: The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 26.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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