Producing an Other Nation: Autogestión, Zapatismo and Tradition in Digital Home Studios in Mexico City

Andrew Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article traces the discourses of “nation” and “tradition” that emerged in the home studio practices of pro-Zapatista activist musicians in the peripheries of the Mexico City metropolitan area. It examines the ways that these practices related to notions of “autogestión” and “autonomy” linked to the contemporary Zapatista movement, which, in turn, were connected to musicians’ freedoms to “preserve” what they perceived as their cultural “roots.” Although these activities ostensibly harked back to ahistorical “tradition,” this article situates them within Mexico’s turn towards neoliberal economic policy since the 1980s, and the attempted reconfiguration of nationalism towards the private sphere that accompanied it.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPopular Music and Society
Early online date6 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

musician
Mexico
Economic Policy
nationalism
agglomeration area
autonomy
discourse
Mexico City
Zapatista
Musicians
Private Sphere
Discourse
Metropolitan
Activists
Autonomy
Nationalism
1980s

Cite this

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Producing an Other Nation: Autogestión, Zapatismo and Tradition in Digital Home Studios in Mexico City. / Green, Andrew.

In: Popular Music and Society, 06.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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