Perspectives On: International Student Mobility

'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility?

Monika Foster

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

Globalisation of higher education encourages increased student mobility as part of the study experience, leading to gaining skills for world citizenship. Cross-cultural adaptation is a desired effect of mobility and internationalisation. However, decision makers at universities often fail to tap into this rich experience and benefits it offers to students. In an increasingly globalised higher education, with universities aiming to encourage student mobility (both inwards and outwards) through exchange and study abroad programmes (Sweeney, 2012), there is a need to examine the benefits of mobility, especially the complex cross-cultural learning involved. Additionally, it is important that Business Schools prepare to counteract possible negative implications of Brexit on student mobility by raising student awareness of its benefits, including intercultural skills. The development of targeted pre- and post- mobility support is proposed in order to ensure it enhances student experience and benefits all stakeholders involved.

This thought piece contributes to the discussion about the value of international student mobility and how it can be
enhanced within Business Schools through long term benefits of cross-cultural learning, given the increased pressure to provide an excellent student experience and hit TEF targets, alongside high quality research for REF. The piece is informed by the results of a study which explored the impact of students’ mobility on cross-cultural adaptation in order to produce a set of recommendations for Business Schools who wish to enhance their students’ outgoing, international mobility. The study is significant in that it highlights the need to consider a more reflective approach to working with students in mobility and a shift away from a mechanistic focus on systems and structures towards developing practical intercultural skills.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherChartered Association of Business Schools
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NamePerspectives On
PublisherChartered Association of Business Schools

Fingerprint

business school
student
intercultural skills
experience
studies abroad
university
internationalization
learning
decision maker
education
citizenship
stakeholder
globalization

Cite this

Foster, M. (2016). Perspectives On: International Student Mobility: 'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility? (Perspectives On). Chartered Association of Business Schools.
Foster, Monika. / Perspectives On: International Student Mobility : 'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility?. Chartered Association of Business Schools, 2016. 14 p. (Perspectives On).
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Foster, M 2016, Perspectives On: International Student Mobility: 'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility? Perspectives On, Chartered Association of Business Schools.

Perspectives On: International Student Mobility : 'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility? / Foster, Monika.

Chartered Association of Business Schools, 2016. 14 p. (Perspectives On).

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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Foster M. Perspectives On: International Student Mobility: 'Ready, Steady, Go!' How Can Business Schools Encourage Mobility? Chartered Association of Business Schools, 2016. 14 p. (Perspectives On).