Abstract

In a project that explored learning for interprofessional practice, images were used to facilitate conversations between professionals from higher education, policy and practice settings for child health and social care. The transcribed interviews were reinterpreted in verse and used by the researchers within their
interdisciplinary discussions. Poetry, narrative and dance were then used to communicate emerging themes that included complexity, creativity and child-centred care. Rather than separate dance from the realm of language the dancer used spoken words to complement the movements and highlight meaning. A mantón (a very large fringed shawl) was used as a symbol of the child’s healthcare experience. At this networking meeting all participants were active within the performance space having been invited to write and reflect and
not merely observe. The researchers recommend performance as an alternative setting for the construction of knowledge in order to encourage reflection, generation of ideas and to promote change.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 9 Dec 2015
EventSociety for Research into Higher Education : Annual Conference 2015 - Celtic Manor Hotel, Newport, United Kingdom
Duration: 9 Dec 201511 Dec 2015
http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2015

Conference

ConferenceSociety for Research into Higher Education
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityNewport
Period9/12/1511/12/15
Internet address

Keywords

  • Academic practice
  • Work
  • Careers and cultures
  • Interdisciplinary
  • Construction of knowledge
  • Interprofessional practice

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    Lewitt, M., Cross, A., Sheward, L., & Beirne, P. (2015). Performing the research data: interdisciplinary approaches in the construction of knowledge. Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education , Newport, United Kingdom. https://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2015/abstracts/0271.pdf