Optimising service provision by non‐specialist advisors: the impact of alcohol and drugs awareness training on perceived levels of role legitimacy, adequacy and satisfaction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose
– Shaw et al. identified the need for alcohol counsellors to have “therapeutic commitment” when working with clients or patients with alcohol problems. Studies building on this work have focussed on how such commitment can be increased. In addition, as helping agencies have increasingly offered support services to people with drug related problems, attention has also been given to staff “therapeutic commitment” when working with both alcohol and drug using populations. This study aims to report on the evaluation of the impact of an alcohol and drugs awareness training programme which was provided for personal advisors (PAs) for young vulnerable people based in a government funded criminal justice project in London.

Design/methodology/approach
– A three‐day alcohol and drug awareness programme was provided for 38 personal advisors. Participants completed an adapted version of the alcohol and alcohol problems perception questionnaire (AAPPQ) assessment instrument, previously developed by Shaw et al., immediately before and then again three weeks after the programme ended. This self‐completion instrument is designed to measure the alcohol and drugs knowledge, attitudes and confidence of the PAs in working with service users experiencing alcohol and drug related difficulties. Components of the AAPPQ are specifically designed to assess staff in relation to their role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. In total, 38 participants completed the AAPPQ at Time 1. However, AAPPQ data for the pre‐and post training programme were only obtained for 16. Time 1 and Time 2 responses for these 16 were entered into SPSS and analysed using five‐paired samples t‐tests.

Findings
– Participants significantly improved their attitudes to working with, and having confidence in the engagement of young people with alcohol and drug problems. Positive changes were also observed in relation to participants' role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. A positive but non‐significant change in participant motivation was identified.

Originality/value
– Alcohol and drugs awareness training programmes have a demonstrable and positive impact on the confidence, perceived role, and confidence of personal advisors working with service users with addiction issues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalDrugs and Alcohol Today
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Illegitimacy
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Education
Criminal Law

Keywords

  • Counselling
  • drugs awareness
  • personal advisors
  • training

Cite this

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title = "Optimising service provision by non‐specialist advisors: the impact of alcohol and drugs awareness training on perceived levels of role legitimacy, adequacy and satisfaction",
abstract = "Purpose– Shaw et al. identified the need for alcohol counsellors to have “therapeutic commitment” when working with clients or patients with alcohol problems. Studies building on this work have focussed on how such commitment can be increased. In addition, as helping agencies have increasingly offered support services to people with drug related problems, attention has also been given to staff “therapeutic commitment” when working with both alcohol and drug using populations. This study aims to report on the evaluation of the impact of an alcohol and drugs awareness training programme which was provided for personal advisors (PAs) for young vulnerable people based in a government funded criminal justice project in London.Design/methodology/approach– A three‐day alcohol and drug awareness programme was provided for 38 personal advisors. Participants completed an adapted version of the alcohol and alcohol problems perception questionnaire (AAPPQ) assessment instrument, previously developed by Shaw et al., immediately before and then again three weeks after the programme ended. This self‐completion instrument is designed to measure the alcohol and drugs knowledge, attitudes and confidence of the PAs in working with service users experiencing alcohol and drug related difficulties. Components of the AAPPQ are specifically designed to assess staff in relation to their role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. In total, 38 participants completed the AAPPQ at Time 1. However, AAPPQ data for the pre‐and post training programme were only obtained for 16. Time 1 and Time 2 responses for these 16 were entered into SPSS and analysed using five‐paired samples t‐tests.Findings– Participants significantly improved their attitudes to working with, and having confidence in the engagement of young people with alcohol and drug problems. Positive changes were also observed in relation to participants' role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. A positive but non‐significant change in participant motivation was identified.Originality/value– Alcohol and drugs awareness training programmes have a demonstrable and positive impact on the confidence, perceived role, and confidence of personal advisors working with service users with addiction issues.",
keywords = "Counselling, drugs awareness, personal advisors, training",
author = "Iain McPhee and Timothy Duffy and Martin, {Colin R.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1108/17459261211211692",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "38--44",
journal = "Drugs and Alcohol Today",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimising service provision by non‐specialist advisors

T2 - the impact of alcohol and drugs awareness training on perceived levels of role legitimacy, adequacy and satisfaction

AU - McPhee, Iain

AU - Duffy, Timothy

AU - Martin, Colin R.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Purpose– Shaw et al. identified the need for alcohol counsellors to have “therapeutic commitment” when working with clients or patients with alcohol problems. Studies building on this work have focussed on how such commitment can be increased. In addition, as helping agencies have increasingly offered support services to people with drug related problems, attention has also been given to staff “therapeutic commitment” when working with both alcohol and drug using populations. This study aims to report on the evaluation of the impact of an alcohol and drugs awareness training programme which was provided for personal advisors (PAs) for young vulnerable people based in a government funded criminal justice project in London.Design/methodology/approach– A three‐day alcohol and drug awareness programme was provided for 38 personal advisors. Participants completed an adapted version of the alcohol and alcohol problems perception questionnaire (AAPPQ) assessment instrument, previously developed by Shaw et al., immediately before and then again three weeks after the programme ended. This self‐completion instrument is designed to measure the alcohol and drugs knowledge, attitudes and confidence of the PAs in working with service users experiencing alcohol and drug related difficulties. Components of the AAPPQ are specifically designed to assess staff in relation to their role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. In total, 38 participants completed the AAPPQ at Time 1. However, AAPPQ data for the pre‐and post training programme were only obtained for 16. Time 1 and Time 2 responses for these 16 were entered into SPSS and analysed using five‐paired samples t‐tests.Findings– Participants significantly improved their attitudes to working with, and having confidence in the engagement of young people with alcohol and drug problems. Positive changes were also observed in relation to participants' role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. A positive but non‐significant change in participant motivation was identified.Originality/value– Alcohol and drugs awareness training programmes have a demonstrable and positive impact on the confidence, perceived role, and confidence of personal advisors working with service users with addiction issues.

AB - Purpose– Shaw et al. identified the need for alcohol counsellors to have “therapeutic commitment” when working with clients or patients with alcohol problems. Studies building on this work have focussed on how such commitment can be increased. In addition, as helping agencies have increasingly offered support services to people with drug related problems, attention has also been given to staff “therapeutic commitment” when working with both alcohol and drug using populations. This study aims to report on the evaluation of the impact of an alcohol and drugs awareness training programme which was provided for personal advisors (PAs) for young vulnerable people based in a government funded criminal justice project in London.Design/methodology/approach– A three‐day alcohol and drug awareness programme was provided for 38 personal advisors. Participants completed an adapted version of the alcohol and alcohol problems perception questionnaire (AAPPQ) assessment instrument, previously developed by Shaw et al., immediately before and then again three weeks after the programme ended. This self‐completion instrument is designed to measure the alcohol and drugs knowledge, attitudes and confidence of the PAs in working with service users experiencing alcohol and drug related difficulties. Components of the AAPPQ are specifically designed to assess staff in relation to their role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. In total, 38 participants completed the AAPPQ at Time 1. However, AAPPQ data for the pre‐and post training programme were only obtained for 16. Time 1 and Time 2 responses for these 16 were entered into SPSS and analysed using five‐paired samples t‐tests.Findings– Participants significantly improved their attitudes to working with, and having confidence in the engagement of young people with alcohol and drug problems. Positive changes were also observed in relation to participants' role legitimacy, role adequacy, role support, and role satisfaction. A positive but non‐significant change in participant motivation was identified.Originality/value– Alcohol and drugs awareness training programmes have a demonstrable and positive impact on the confidence, perceived role, and confidence of personal advisors working with service users with addiction issues.

KW - Counselling

KW - drugs awareness

KW - personal advisors

KW - training

U2 - 10.1108/17459261211211692

DO - 10.1108/17459261211211692

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 38

EP - 44

JO - Drugs and Alcohol Today

JF - Drugs and Alcohol Today

SN - 1745-9265

IS - 1

ER -