Objective tests, learning to learn and learning styles: a comment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Given the growing interest concerning the use of alternative assessment methods in accounting education, Sangster's recent paper in this journal is to be welcomed (June, 1996). Sangster presents evidence of his use of objective testing (OT) in a second-level course over five years, comparing performance and the background characteristics of students (including learning styles) in two of those years, and finds learning styles have an impact upon performance. The paper presents an interesting and topical account of the use of OTs in an accounting course over an extended period. However, his applied use of learning styles and the Learning Styles Questionnaire (LSQ) in this context is methodologically questionable. This comment indicates how future research might build on his exploratory work. Issues of concern include the literature base, the psychometric properties of the LSQ, analysis and disclosure of results and educational implications
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-345
Number of pages11
JournalAccounting Education
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

learning
questionnaire
psychometrics
performance
Learning styles
evidence
education
student
Questionnaire
literature
Testing
Accounting education
Student learning
Education
Disclosure
Psychometrics

Keywords

  • Objective test
  • Learning styles
  • Reliability
  • Validity

Cite this

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Objective tests, learning to learn and learning styles : a comment. / Duff, Angus.

In: Accounting Education, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1998, p. 335-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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