My Home Life: Measuring impact through practice development

Julienne Meyer, Belinda Dewar, Karen Barrie

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

This paper examines the learning and perceived difference that the MHL Leadership Support programme has made to practice development in care homes, from the perspectives of participants. It draws on self-report findings from a multi-method study of 11 cohorts of care/nursing home managers (n=119) participating in the programme in Scotland (January 2013-April 2015). Findings demonstrate positive impact on managers, enhanced leadership skills, better communication and relationships with staff, and positive benefits for residents & relatives. Whilst these findings should be interpreted with caution due to their self-report nature, participants demonstrated discernible difference in identifying positive change over time related to their own circle of influence. The paper flags up a number of issues for consideration when trying to measure impact of complex interventions, in complex settings. It highlights the possible need to develop new process measures to gage the spread of impact throughout the various circles of influence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)758-758
JournalInnovation in Aging
Volume1
Issue numberSuppl 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jul 2017
Event21st World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 23 Jul 201727 Jul 2017

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manager
leadership
nursing home
home care
communication skills
resident
staff
learning
time

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Meyer, Julienne ; Dewar, Belinda ; Barrie, Karen. / My Home Life : Measuring impact through practice development. In: Innovation in Aging. 2017 ; Vol. 1, No. Suppl 1. pp. 758-758.
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My Home Life : Measuring impact through practice development. / Meyer, Julienne; Dewar, Belinda; Barrie, Karen.

In: Innovation in Aging, Vol. 1, No. Suppl 1, 12.07.2017, p. 758-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

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