Medical education in Nigeria and migration: a mixed-methods study of how the perception of quality influences migration decision making

Eddy Awire*, Mamodesan Okumagba

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Medical education in Nigeria faces numerous challenges and problems; a lack of a coherent admission policy, inadequate funding, poor planning, and erosion of values have led to a general perception of low standards and quality. In the face of these, questions arise as to their influence on medical students’ aspirations and intentions to migrate after graduation. This study uses a sequential mixed-method design to examine the extent to which the perceptions of the quality of medical education in Nigeria affect the aspirations and plans of Nigerian medical students to migrate after graduation. 211 final year students (out of a potential 580) participated in a survey; aged between 20 and 45. While the survey showed that the students perceived medical education to be of sufficiently good quality across a spectrum of variables, interview respondents described a dysfunctional medical education that failed to meet their aspirations. The perception of a declining standard in medical training is a major issue for Nigerian medical students and graduates. The inability to halt the decline in the quality of medical training in Nigeria, therefore, leaves many medical students and graduates feeling inadequately trained, and inadvertently feeds their desires and aspirations to migrate abroad after graduation.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages13
JournalMedEdPublish
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • medical education
  • medical students
  • perception of quality
  • migration aspirations
  • migration
  • migration history

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