Is Virtual Reality sickness elicited by illusory motion affected by gender and prior video gaming experience?

Katharina Margareta Theresa Pöhlmann*, Louise O'Hare, Julia Föcker, Adrian Parke, Patrick Dickinson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

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Abstract

Gaming using VR headsets is becoming increasingly popular; how-ever, these displays can cause VR sickness. To investigate the effectsof gender and gamer type on VR sickness motion illusions are usedas stimuli, being a novel method of inducing the perception of motionwhilst minimising the “accommodation vergence conflict”. Femalesand those who do not play action games experienced more severeVR sickness symptoms compared to males and experienced actiongamers. The interaction of the gender and gamer type revealed thatprior video gaming experience was beneficial for females, however,for males, it did not show the same positive effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages426-427
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 27 Mar 2021
EventIEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2021: Make Virtual Reality Diverse and Accessible - Online
Duration: 27 Mar 20212 Apr 2021
https://ieeevr.org/2021/

Conference

ConferenceIEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2021
Abbreviated titleIEEE VR 2021
Period27/03/212/04/21
Internet address

Keywords

  • virtual reality
  • Fraser Wilcox illusions
  • VR sickness
  • discomfort; head movements
  • gender
  • adaptation
  • habituation

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