Internationalisation, higher education and educators' perceptions of their practices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Internationalisation of higher education is big business in Australia, yet, despite the growing body of literature informing learning and teaching of international students, challenges remain. While language and pedagogical differences are well documented from the students' perspective, less known are the challenges to educators and their practices in responding to these named issues. This article explores some implications for educators and their practices, when international students come to study in an English-language university in Australia. A small research project focusing on educators' perspectives reveals the pedagogical challenges, difficulties and differences in approaches to teaching large numbers of international students. Implications for educators are discussed, focusing on the need to respond to policy and institutional demands to participate in these international collaborations, and to engage in building sound and equitable educational provision.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)236-248
Number of pages13
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • international students
  • higher education
  • teaching practices

Cite this

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Internationalisation, higher education and educators' perceptions of their practices. / Daniels, Jeannie.

In: Teaching in Higher Education, Vol. 18, No. 3, 03.09.2012, p. 236-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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