Implementing high-speed running and sprinting training in professional soccer

Marco Beato*, Barry Drust, Antonio Dello Iacono

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-speed running and sprinting training play an important role in the development of physical capabilities, sport-specific performance and injury prevention among soccer players. This commentary aims to summarize the current evidence regarding high-speed running and sprinting training in professional soccer and to inform their implementation in research and applied settings. It is structured into four sections:
1) Evidence-based high-speed running and sprinting conditioning methodologies;
2) Monitoring of high-speed running and sprinting performance in soccer
3) Recommendations for effective implementation of high-speed running and sprinting training in applied soccer settings;
4) Limitations and future directions.

The contemporary literature provides preliminary methodological guidelines for coaches and practitioners. The recommended methods to ensure high-speed running and sprinting exposure for both conditioning purposes and injury prevention strategies among soccer players are: high intensity running training, field-based drills and ball-drills in the form of medium- and large sided games. Global navigation satellite systems are valid and reliable technologies for high speed running and sprinting monitoring practice. Future research is required to refine, and advance training practices aimed at optimizing individual high-speed running and sprinting training responses and associated long-term effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-299
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume42
Issue number04
Early online date8 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • GPS
  • football
  • performance
  • team sports

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