Imagining Relational Violence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this article is to problematize a notion of relational violence, also referred to as violence in domestic realms or relationship-based violence, drawing on its representation in the visual arts. The discussed examples illustrating the dynamics of violence include two American artists: Barbara Kruger's project organized in Glasgow in the Gallery of Modern Art in association with Amnesty International in 2005, and Bruce Nauman's video installations Anthro-Socio (1992) exhibited as part of his solo exhibition at Musee d'Art Contemporain in Montreal in 2007, and Violent Incident (1986) from the Tate Collection. Drawing on visual representation, I reflect on how different ways of narrating can either encourage or discourage our understandings of violence and the promotion of equality more generally. Framing the ways institutional power operates, here in relation to an organization of my academic role and other roles, involves a production and negotiation of meanings as well as embodiment. In such a context, reflections emerge with regard to my own positioning, concerning ambivalence about the politics of representation and the representation of the politics in the processes that are observed, analysed and showcased.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-208
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Arts & Communities
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

violence
art
Amnesty International
politics
ambivalence
artist
equality
incident
promotion
video
narrative
organization

Cite this

@article{d32350c831114b01b58697ccd337e476,
title = "Imagining Relational Violence",
abstract = "The objective of this article is to problematize a notion of relational violence, also referred to as violence in domestic realms or relationship-based violence, drawing on its representation in the visual arts. The discussed examples illustrating the dynamics of violence include two American artists: Barbara Kruger's project organized in Glasgow in the Gallery of Modern Art in association with Amnesty International in 2005, and Bruce Nauman's video installations Anthro-Socio (1992) exhibited as part of his solo exhibition at Musee d'Art Contemporain in Montreal in 2007, and Violent Incident (1986) from the Tate Collection. Drawing on visual representation, I reflect on how different ways of narrating can either encourage or discourage our understandings of violence and the promotion of equality more generally. Framing the ways institutional power operates, here in relation to an organization of my academic role and other roles, involves a production and negotiation of meanings as well as embodiment. In such a context, reflections emerge with regard to my own positioning, concerning ambivalence about the politics of representation and the representation of the politics in the processes that are observed, analysed and showcased.",
author = "Katarzyna Kosmala",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1386/jaac.2.3.197_1",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "197--208",
journal = "Journal of Arts & Communities",
issn = "1757-1936",
publisher = "Intellect",
number = "3",

}

Imagining Relational Violence. / Kosmala, Katarzyna.

In: Journal of Arts & Communities , Vol. 2, No. 3, 2010, p. 197-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imagining Relational Violence

AU - Kosmala, Katarzyna

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The objective of this article is to problematize a notion of relational violence, also referred to as violence in domestic realms or relationship-based violence, drawing on its representation in the visual arts. The discussed examples illustrating the dynamics of violence include two American artists: Barbara Kruger's project organized in Glasgow in the Gallery of Modern Art in association with Amnesty International in 2005, and Bruce Nauman's video installations Anthro-Socio (1992) exhibited as part of his solo exhibition at Musee d'Art Contemporain in Montreal in 2007, and Violent Incident (1986) from the Tate Collection. Drawing on visual representation, I reflect on how different ways of narrating can either encourage or discourage our understandings of violence and the promotion of equality more generally. Framing the ways institutional power operates, here in relation to an organization of my academic role and other roles, involves a production and negotiation of meanings as well as embodiment. In such a context, reflections emerge with regard to my own positioning, concerning ambivalence about the politics of representation and the representation of the politics in the processes that are observed, analysed and showcased.

AB - The objective of this article is to problematize a notion of relational violence, also referred to as violence in domestic realms or relationship-based violence, drawing on its representation in the visual arts. The discussed examples illustrating the dynamics of violence include two American artists: Barbara Kruger's project organized in Glasgow in the Gallery of Modern Art in association with Amnesty International in 2005, and Bruce Nauman's video installations Anthro-Socio (1992) exhibited as part of his solo exhibition at Musee d'Art Contemporain in Montreal in 2007, and Violent Incident (1986) from the Tate Collection. Drawing on visual representation, I reflect on how different ways of narrating can either encourage or discourage our understandings of violence and the promotion of equality more generally. Framing the ways institutional power operates, here in relation to an organization of my academic role and other roles, involves a production and negotiation of meanings as well as embodiment. In such a context, reflections emerge with regard to my own positioning, concerning ambivalence about the politics of representation and the representation of the politics in the processes that are observed, analysed and showcased.

U2 - 10.1386/jaac.2.3.197_1

DO - 10.1386/jaac.2.3.197_1

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 197

EP - 208

JO - Journal of Arts & Communities

JF - Journal of Arts & Communities

SN - 1757-1936

IS - 3

ER -