Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency

implications for both personal life and teaching/learning

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Technological advances over the last decade have had a significant impact on the teaching and learning experiences students encounter today. We now take technologies such as Web 2.0, mobile devices, cloud computing, podcasts, social networking, super-fast broadband, and connectedness for granted. So what about the student use of these types of technologies? Is there a blurring of the distinction between using them for academic purposes versus social use in their everyday lives? If so, what lessons can Higher Education learn from the fields of HCI and User Experience Design (UXD) about improving engagement through using familiar, intuitive and exciting interactions with technology?

One of the factors driving the development of new pedagogies associated with the use of technologies for learning is a concern that there may be differences between the way that students use technologies today for socialising, working and learning. This paper describes the experiences of undergraduate students within the School of Engineering and Computing at the University of the West of Scotland. Initially under the auspices of a UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) Digital Literacies project, groups of students have completed activity maps to show how they used modern technologies for educational and personal purposes, and whether Visitor or Resident behaviour is exhibited. An analysis of these maps may prove interesting showing which tools are most popular and which are niche-focussed in order to assess the implications for student engagement and enjoyment of learning.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016
Subtitle of host publicationMannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016
EditorsDemetrios G. Sampson, J. Michael Spector, Dirk Ifenthaler, Pedro Isaias
PublisherIADIS Press
Pages307-310
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9789898533555
Publication statusPublished - 30 Oct 2016
Event13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age - University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany
Duration: 28 Oct 201630 Oct 2016
Conference number: 2017
http://celda-conf.org/

Conference

Conference13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age
Abbreviated titleCELDA
CountryGermany
CityMannheim
Period28/10/1630/10/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

Internet
Teaching
interaction
learning
student
project group
experience
academy
everyday life
networking
education
resident
engineering
school

Keywords

  • HCI, Pedagogies, Internet Residency, Digital Literacies, Visitor, Resident

Cite this

Crearie, L. (2016). Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency: implications for both personal life and teaching/learning. In D. G. Sampson, J. M. Spector, D. Ifenthaler, & P. Isaias (Eds.), Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016: Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016 (pp. 307-310). IADIS Press.
Crearie, Linda. / Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency : implications for both personal life and teaching/learning. Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016: Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016. editor / Demetrios G. Sampson ; J. Michael Spector ; Dirk Ifenthaler ; Pedro Isaias. IADIS Press, 2016. pp. 307-310
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title = "Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency: implications for both personal life and teaching/learning",
abstract = "Technological advances over the last decade have had a significant impact on the teaching and learning experiences students encounter today. We now take technologies such as Web 2.0, mobile devices, cloud computing, podcasts, social networking, super-fast broadband, and connectedness for granted. So what about the student use of these types of technologies? Is there a blurring of the distinction between using them for academic purposes versus social use in their everyday lives? If so, what lessons can Higher Education learn from the fields of HCI and User Experience Design (UXD) about improving engagement through using familiar, intuitive and exciting interactions with technology? One of the factors driving the development of new pedagogies associated with the use of technologies for learning is a concern that there may be differences between the way that students use technologies today for socialising, working and learning. This paper describes the experiences of undergraduate students within the School of Engineering and Computing at the University of the West of Scotland. Initially under the auspices of a UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) Digital Literacies project, groups of students have completed activity maps to show how they used modern technologies for educational and personal purposes, and whether Visitor or Resident behaviour is exhibited. An analysis of these maps may prove interesting showing which tools are most popular and which are niche-focussed in order to assess the implications for student engagement and enjoyment of learning.",
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Crearie, L 2016, Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency: implications for both personal life and teaching/learning. in DG Sampson, JM Spector, D Ifenthaler & P Isaias (eds), Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016: Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016. IADIS Press, pp. 307-310, 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, Mannheim, Germany, 28/10/16.

Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency : implications for both personal life and teaching/learning. / Crearie, Linda.

Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016: Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016. ed. / Demetrios G. Sampson; J. Michael Spector; Dirk Ifenthaler; Pedro Isaias. IADIS Press, 2016. p. 307-310.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency

T2 - implications for both personal life and teaching/learning

AU - Crearie, Linda

PY - 2016/10/30

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N2 - Technological advances over the last decade have had a significant impact on the teaching and learning experiences students encounter today. We now take technologies such as Web 2.0, mobile devices, cloud computing, podcasts, social networking, super-fast broadband, and connectedness for granted. So what about the student use of these types of technologies? Is there a blurring of the distinction between using them for academic purposes versus social use in their everyday lives? If so, what lessons can Higher Education learn from the fields of HCI and User Experience Design (UXD) about improving engagement through using familiar, intuitive and exciting interactions with technology? One of the factors driving the development of new pedagogies associated with the use of technologies for learning is a concern that there may be differences between the way that students use technologies today for socialising, working and learning. This paper describes the experiences of undergraduate students within the School of Engineering and Computing at the University of the West of Scotland. Initially under the auspices of a UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) Digital Literacies project, groups of students have completed activity maps to show how they used modern technologies for educational and personal purposes, and whether Visitor or Resident behaviour is exhibited. An analysis of these maps may prove interesting showing which tools are most popular and which are niche-focussed in order to assess the implications for student engagement and enjoyment of learning.

AB - Technological advances over the last decade have had a significant impact on the teaching and learning experiences students encounter today. We now take technologies such as Web 2.0, mobile devices, cloud computing, podcasts, social networking, super-fast broadband, and connectedness for granted. So what about the student use of these types of technologies? Is there a blurring of the distinction between using them for academic purposes versus social use in their everyday lives? If so, what lessons can Higher Education learn from the fields of HCI and User Experience Design (UXD) about improving engagement through using familiar, intuitive and exciting interactions with technology? One of the factors driving the development of new pedagogies associated with the use of technologies for learning is a concern that there may be differences between the way that students use technologies today for socialising, working and learning. This paper describes the experiences of undergraduate students within the School of Engineering and Computing at the University of the West of Scotland. Initially under the auspices of a UK Higher Education Academy (HEA) Digital Literacies project, groups of students have completed activity maps to show how they used modern technologies for educational and personal purposes, and whether Visitor or Resident behaviour is exhibited. An analysis of these maps may prove interesting showing which tools are most popular and which are niche-focussed in order to assess the implications for student engagement and enjoyment of learning.

KW - HCI, Pedagogies, Internet Residency, Digital Literacies, Visitor, Resident

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 307

EP - 310

BT - Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016

A2 - Sampson, Demetrios G.

A2 - Spector, J. Michael

A2 - Ifenthaler, Dirk

A2 - Isaias, Pedro

PB - IADIS Press

ER -

Crearie L. Human computer interaction (hci) and internet residency: implications for both personal life and teaching/learning. In Sampson DG, Spector JM, Ifenthaler D, Isaias P, editors, Proceedings of 13th International Conference on Cognition & Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age, CELDA 2016: Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016. IADIS Press. 2016. p. 307-310