How can we achieve person-centred care for people living with HIV/AIDS? A qualitative interview study with healthcare professionals and patients in Ghana

Mary Abboah-Offei*, K. Bristowe, Jonathan Koffman, Naa Ashiley Vanderpuye-Donton, Gloria Ansa, Melanie Abas, Irene Higginson, Richard Harding

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Although person-centred care (PCC) has been identified as a means to achieve the 90-90-90 targets, limited research has considered PCC in low- or middle-income settings. We aimed to explore what constitutes PCC from the perspectives of PLWHA and healthcare professionals (HCP) in Ghana. We conducted 39 semi-structured qualitative interviews with PLWHA and HCP in two community clinics in Ghana, West Africa. Interviews were analysed deductively using thematic analysis, and sampling continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Twenty-four PLWHA (median age 42.5, 50% female) and 15 HCP (median age 34, 53% female) were interviewed. Three interconnected themes emerged across PLWHA and HCP: (1) care structures not built around the person, (2) priority outcomes and components of PCC and (3) re-engineering HIV care to be more person-centred. A conceptual model showing the overlap between PLWHA and HCP’s perspectives of PCC and a framework to inform PCC delivery have been developed from these findings. Our data revealed that PLWHA want PCC to improve care outcomes, well-being and quality of life. Further testing of this model is required to inform PCC delivery for PLWHA in low- and middle-income countries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1479-1488
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Care
Volume32
Issue number12
Early online date4 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Dec 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • holistic care
  • person-centred care
  • Ghana
  • community-based care

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