Here’s looking at you: visuospatial biases can influence judgements of faces and art

Bianca Hatin, Laurie Sykes Tottenham

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Prior research suggests that line bisection may measure not only pseudoneglect, but also emotion processing and perhaps right hemisphere function in general (Drago et al., 2008). However, in this research ratings of emotional evocation from paintings were made using ascending line-based scales, possibly confounding ratings with line bisection biases owing to pseudoneglect. The present study addressed this confound by using ascending and descending rating scales and also extended the research to include overtly emotional stimuli. Interactions between line bisection and scale type were observed on emotion ratings, suggesting line bisection is related to biases in visuospatial attention, but not emotion processing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269
JournalCanadian Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2012
Event22nd Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science Annual Meeting - Kingston, Canada
Duration: 7 Jun 20129 Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Visuoaspatial bias
  • Psychology
  • Line bisection

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