Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise

Julien Baker, Edward Brown, Gary Hill, Glen Phillips, Russell Williams, Bruce Davies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the upper-body contribution via handgrip to power profiles and blood lactate concentrations during high-intensity cycle ergometry.

Methods

Nine trained male subjects each completed a 20-s high-intensity cycle ergometer test twice, in a random manner, using two protocols, with a handgrip (WG), and without handgrip (WOHG). Capillary (earlobe) blood samples were obtained pre- and post-exercise. Blood samples were corrected for plasma volume changes and analyzed to determine blood lactate concentrations.

Results

In the WG protocol, mean (±SEM) blood lactate concentrations sampled over the three conditions were 0.98 ± 0.33 mmol·L−1, 5.68 ± 0.46 mmol·L−1, and 9.14 ± 0.38 mmol·L−1, respectively. During the WOHG protocol, blood lactate values recorded were 0.99 ± 0.26 mmol·L−1, 5.58 ± 0.58 mmol·L−1, and 7.62 ± 0.65 mmol·L−1, respectively. Differences were found (P < 0.05) from rest to 4 min after exercise for both groups. Differences in concentrations were also observed between groups at the 4-min postexercise blood-sampling stage. Peak power output values recorded using the WG protocol were also greater (1461 ± 94 W vs 1136 ± 88 W;P < 0.05). No differences were recorded for mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), or work done (WD).

Conclusion

Results indicate significant differences in power output and blood lactate concentrations between protocols. These findings suggest that the performance of traditional style leg-cycle ergometry requires a muscular contribution from the whole body. As such, researchers should consider this, both in terms of the allocation of ergometer loads, and in the analysis of blood-borne metabolites.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1040
Number of pages4
JournalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Volume34
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Lactic Acid
Leg
Ergometry
Plasma Volume
Fatigue
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Wingate test
  • cycle ergometry

Cite this

Baker, J., Brown, E., Hill, G., Phillips, G., Williams, R., & Davies, B. (2002). Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 34(6), 1037-1040.
Baker, Julien ; Brown, Edward ; Hill, Gary ; Phillips, Glen ; Williams, Russell ; Davies, Bruce. / Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise. In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2002 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 1037-1040.
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Baker, J, Brown, E, Hill, G, Phillips, G, Williams, R & Davies, B 2002, 'Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise' Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 1037-1040.

Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise. / Baker, Julien; Brown, Edward; Hill, Gary; Phillips, Glen; Williams, Russell; Davies, Bruce.

In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Vol. 34, No. 6, 01.06.2002, p. 1037-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Handgrip contribution to lactate production and leg power during high-intensity exercise

AU - Baker, Julien

AU - Brown, Edward

AU - Hill, Gary

AU - Phillips, Glen

AU - Williams, Russell

AU - Davies, Bruce

PY - 2002/6/1

Y1 - 2002/6/1

N2 - Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the upper-body contribution via handgrip to power profiles and blood lactate concentrations during high-intensity cycle ergometry.Methods Nine trained male subjects each completed a 20-s high-intensity cycle ergometer test twice, in a random manner, using two protocols, with a handgrip (WG), and without handgrip (WOHG). Capillary (earlobe) blood samples were obtained pre- and post-exercise. Blood samples were corrected for plasma volume changes and analyzed to determine blood lactate concentrations.Results In the WG protocol, mean (±SEM) blood lactate concentrations sampled over the three conditions were 0.98 ± 0.33 mmol·L−1, 5.68 ± 0.46 mmol·L−1, and 9.14 ± 0.38 mmol·L−1, respectively. During the WOHG protocol, blood lactate values recorded were 0.99 ± 0.26 mmol·L−1, 5.58 ± 0.58 mmol·L−1, and 7.62 ± 0.65 mmol·L−1, respectively. Differences were found (P < 0.05) from rest to 4 min after exercise for both groups. Differences in concentrations were also observed between groups at the 4-min postexercise blood-sampling stage. Peak power output values recorded using the WG protocol were also greater (1461 ± 94 W vs 1136 ± 88 W;P < 0.05). No differences were recorded for mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), or work done (WD).Conclusion Results indicate significant differences in power output and blood lactate concentrations between protocols. These findings suggest that the performance of traditional style leg-cycle ergometry requires a muscular contribution from the whole body. As such, researchers should consider this, both in terms of the allocation of ergometer loads, and in the analysis of blood-borne metabolites.

AB - Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the upper-body contribution via handgrip to power profiles and blood lactate concentrations during high-intensity cycle ergometry.Methods Nine trained male subjects each completed a 20-s high-intensity cycle ergometer test twice, in a random manner, using two protocols, with a handgrip (WG), and without handgrip (WOHG). Capillary (earlobe) blood samples were obtained pre- and post-exercise. Blood samples were corrected for plasma volume changes and analyzed to determine blood lactate concentrations.Results In the WG protocol, mean (±SEM) blood lactate concentrations sampled over the three conditions were 0.98 ± 0.33 mmol·L−1, 5.68 ± 0.46 mmol·L−1, and 9.14 ± 0.38 mmol·L−1, respectively. During the WOHG protocol, blood lactate values recorded were 0.99 ± 0.26 mmol·L−1, 5.58 ± 0.58 mmol·L−1, and 7.62 ± 0.65 mmol·L−1, respectively. Differences were found (P < 0.05) from rest to 4 min after exercise for both groups. Differences in concentrations were also observed between groups at the 4-min postexercise blood-sampling stage. Peak power output values recorded using the WG protocol were also greater (1461 ± 94 W vs 1136 ± 88 W;P < 0.05). No differences were recorded for mean power output (MPO), fatigue index (FI), or work done (WD).Conclusion Results indicate significant differences in power output and blood lactate concentrations between protocols. These findings suggest that the performance of traditional style leg-cycle ergometry requires a muscular contribution from the whole body. As such, researchers should consider this, both in terms of the allocation of ergometer loads, and in the analysis of blood-borne metabolites.

KW - Wingate test

KW - cycle ergometry

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 1037

EP - 1040

JO - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

JF - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 6

ER -