Getting disadvantaged parents into employment: the Working for Families Fund in Scotland

Sue Bond, Ronald McQuaid, Vanesa Fuertes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 2004 and 2008, the Scottish Government’s Working for Families Fund (WFF) in Scotland offered support to parents seeking to move into, within or towards employment, education or training. Focused on disadvantaged parents, the programme had registered a total of over 25,000 clients by April 2008, with 66 per cent of these having achieved a significant outcome during the life of the programme. In this paper, we examine the policy background from which the WFF programme emerged. The paper outlines key features of the programme that are distinct from other programmes (particularly the New Deal for Lone Parents) as well as setting out the key outcomes of the programme. The paper identifies some lessons concerning how WFF operated, and, finally, it outlines the key conclusions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-501
Number of pages15
JournalLocal Economy
Volume24
Issue number6-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Scotland
Lone parents
OR education
Government

Cite this

@article{a8310e167d1c49ee8a841329c8b9d9b4,
title = "Getting disadvantaged parents into employment: the Working for Families Fund in Scotland",
abstract = "Between 2004 and 2008, the Scottish Government’s Working for Families Fund (WFF) in Scotland offered support to parents seeking to move into, within or towards employment, education or training. Focused on disadvantaged parents, the programme had registered a total of over 25,000 clients by April 2008, with 66 per cent of these having achieved a significant outcome during the life of the programme. In this paper, we examine the policy background from which the WFF programme emerged. The paper outlines key features of the programme that are distinct from other programmes (particularly the New Deal for Lone Parents) as well as setting out the key outcomes of the programme. The paper identifies some lessons concerning how WFF operated, and, finally, it outlines the key conclusions.",
author = "Sue Bond and Ronald McQuaid and Vanesa Fuertes",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02690940903314852",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "487--501",
journal = "Local Economy",
issn = "0269-0942",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "6-7",

}

Getting disadvantaged parents into employment : the Working for Families Fund in Scotland. / Bond, Sue; McQuaid, Ronald; Fuertes, Vanesa.

In: Local Economy, Vol. 24, No. 6-7, 01.09.2009, p. 487-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Getting disadvantaged parents into employment

T2 - the Working for Families Fund in Scotland

AU - Bond, Sue

AU - McQuaid, Ronald

AU - Fuertes, Vanesa

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - Between 2004 and 2008, the Scottish Government’s Working for Families Fund (WFF) in Scotland offered support to parents seeking to move into, within or towards employment, education or training. Focused on disadvantaged parents, the programme had registered a total of over 25,000 clients by April 2008, with 66 per cent of these having achieved a significant outcome during the life of the programme. In this paper, we examine the policy background from which the WFF programme emerged. The paper outlines key features of the programme that are distinct from other programmes (particularly the New Deal for Lone Parents) as well as setting out the key outcomes of the programme. The paper identifies some lessons concerning how WFF operated, and, finally, it outlines the key conclusions.

AB - Between 2004 and 2008, the Scottish Government’s Working for Families Fund (WFF) in Scotland offered support to parents seeking to move into, within or towards employment, education or training. Focused on disadvantaged parents, the programme had registered a total of over 25,000 clients by April 2008, with 66 per cent of these having achieved a significant outcome during the life of the programme. In this paper, we examine the policy background from which the WFF programme emerged. The paper outlines key features of the programme that are distinct from other programmes (particularly the New Deal for Lone Parents) as well as setting out the key outcomes of the programme. The paper identifies some lessons concerning how WFF operated, and, finally, it outlines the key conclusions.

U2 - 10.1080/02690940903314852

DO - 10.1080/02690940903314852

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 487

EP - 501

JO - Local Economy

JF - Local Economy

SN - 0269-0942

IS - 6-7

ER -