Future proofing heritage: understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage

John Hughes, Martin Lee, Bernie Smith

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The cluster met three times in 2009, on each occasion focusing on issues relating to the vulnerabilities and resilience of a World Heritage Site. The context for the group’s work was of risks from climate variability to landscape, archaeology and built environment. The range of participants was wide, many from academia, but also from local authorities, heritage organisations that influence devolved government policy in heritage and the private sector. At each meeting there were core participants, who were joined by stakeholders with more local interests. More than 60 individuals played a direct part in the cluster activities. This story includes outcomes in terms of topics discussed and research directions considered important by the participants.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme
Subtitle of host publicationContributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013
EditorsMay Cassar, Debbie Williams
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherUniversity College London
Pages36-37
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2014
EventSustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research. AHRC/EPSRC Scince and Heritgae Programme - Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London , United Kingdom
Duration: 29 Oct 201430 Oct 2014

Conference

ConferenceSustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research. AHRC/EPSRC Scince and Heritgae Programme
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period29/10/1430/10/14

Fingerprint

World Heritage Site
cultural landscape
archaeology
private sector
vulnerability
stakeholder
climate
government policy
built environment
local authority

Keywords

  • Heritage
  • Heritage science
  • Built cultural heritage
  • Built heritage
  • Climate change
  • Archaeology
  • Cultural landscapes

Cite this

Hughes, J., Lee, M., & Smith, B. (2014). Future proofing heritage: understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage. In M. Cassar, & D. Williams (Eds.), Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme: Contributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013 (pp. 36-37). London: University College London.
Hughes, John ; Lee, Martin ; Smith, Bernie. / Future proofing heritage : understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage. Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme: Contributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013. editor / May Cassar ; Debbie Williams. London : University College London, 2014. pp. 36-37
@inproceedings{70dcb43ecedb4618a1494d53cf7938bf,
title = "Future proofing heritage: understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage",
abstract = "The cluster met three times in 2009, on each occasion focusing on issues relating to the vulnerabilities and resilience of a World Heritage Site. The context for the group’s work was of risks from climate variability to landscape, archaeology and built environment. The range of participants was wide, many from academia, but also from local authorities, heritage organisations that influence devolved government policy in heritage and the private sector. At each meeting there were core participants, who were joined by stakeholders with more local interests. More than 60 individuals played a direct part in the cluster activities. This story includes outcomes in terms of topics discussed and research directions considered important by the participants.",
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author = "John Hughes and Martin Lee and Bernie Smith",
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Hughes, J, Lee, M & Smith, B 2014, Future proofing heritage: understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage. in M Cassar & D Williams (eds), Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme: Contributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013. University College London, London, pp. 36-37, Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research. AHRC/EPSRC Scince and Heritgae Programme, London , United Kingdom, 29/10/14.

Future proofing heritage : understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage. / Hughes, John; Lee, Martin; Smith, Bernie.

Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme: Contributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013. ed. / May Cassar; Debbie Williams. London : University College London, 2014. p. 36-37.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Future proofing heritage

T2 - understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage

AU - Hughes, John

AU - Lee, Martin

AU - Smith, Bernie

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N2 - The cluster met three times in 2009, on each occasion focusing on issues relating to the vulnerabilities and resilience of a World Heritage Site. The context for the group’s work was of risks from climate variability to landscape, archaeology and built environment. The range of participants was wide, many from academia, but also from local authorities, heritage organisations that influence devolved government policy in heritage and the private sector. At each meeting there were core participants, who were joined by stakeholders with more local interests. More than 60 individuals played a direct part in the cluster activities. This story includes outcomes in terms of topics discussed and research directions considered important by the participants.

AB - The cluster met three times in 2009, on each occasion focusing on issues relating to the vulnerabilities and resilience of a World Heritage Site. The context for the group’s work was of risks from climate variability to landscape, archaeology and built environment. The range of participants was wide, many from academia, but also from local authorities, heritage organisations that influence devolved government policy in heritage and the private sector. At each meeting there were core participants, who were joined by stakeholders with more local interests. More than 60 individuals played a direct part in the cluster activities. This story includes outcomes in terms of topics discussed and research directions considered important by the participants.

KW - Heritage

KW - Heritage science

KW - Built cultural heritage

KW - Built heritage

KW - Climate change

KW - Archaeology

KW - Cultural landscapes

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 36

EP - 37

BT - Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme

A2 - Cassar, May

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PB - University College London

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Hughes J, Lee M, Smith B. Future proofing heritage: understanding transformation and resilience in our cultural landscapes, archaeology and built heritage. In Cassar M, Williams D, editors, Sustaining the Impact of UK Science and Heritage Research - AHRC/EPSRC Science & Heritage Programme: Contributions to the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme Conference 29-30 October 2013. London: University College London. 2014. p. 36-37